The Grumman (now Northrop Grumman) EA-6B Prowler is an electronic warfare aircraft that was operated by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Outfitted with advanced avionics and jamming equipment, the Prowler is designed to protect aerial strike forces by jamming enemy radar and communications. It also performs electronic surveillance and gathers electronic intelligence. Based on Grumman's A-6 Intruder airframe, the EA-6B sports a radome on its vertical stabilizer, an enlarged cockpit for two or three Electronic Countermeasures Officers, and the ability to carry and fire anti-radiation missiles (ARMs). It has gone through multiple upgrades in its four decades of service, and its ability to suppress enemy air defense remains formidable.

The Prowler has been in service since 1971 and, at one point, was the only tactical radar support jammer for the U.S. Armed Forces. It served in the Vietnam War and Operation Desert Storm and has participated in numerous other combat and support missions.

The Museum of Flight's Prowler flew with Electronic Attack Squadron VAQ-134 (“Garudas”), which was based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington. Following the Navy’s decision to replace its Grumman Prowlers with Boeing EA-18G Growlers, the National Naval Aviation Museum offered this Prowler to The Museum of Flight on long-term loan. This EA-6B was officially decommissioned on May 27, 2015, following its final active-duty flight – to The Museum of Flight – where the Prowler became the first electronic-warfare aircraft to go on display.

This aircraft loan courtesy of the National Naval Aviation Museum at Pensacola, Florida.

Serial Number:
161884
Wingspan:
53.00 ft
Length:
59 ft 10 in
Height:
16 ft 3 in
Wing Area:
528.90 ft²
Empty Weight:
32,162 lbs
Gross Weight:
65,000 lbs
Maximum Speed:
658 mph
Power Plant:
Two Pratt & Whitney J52-P-408 turbojets of 11,200-lb static thrust each
Range:
2,021 miles

The Grumman (now Northrop Grumman) EA-6B Prowler is an electronic warfare aircraft that was operated by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Outfitted with advanced avionics and jamming equipment, the Prowler is designed to protect aerial strike forces by jamming enemy radar and communications. It also performs electronic surveillance and gathers electronic intelligence. Based on Grumman's A-6 Intruder airframe, the EA-6B sports a radome on its vertical stabilizer, an enlarged cockpit for two or three Electronic Countermeasures Officers, and the ability to carry and fire anti-radiation missiles (ARMs). It has gone through multiple upgrades in its four decades of service, and its ability to suppress enemy air defense remains formidable.

The Prowler has been in service since 1971 and, at one point, was the only tactical radar support jammer for the U.S. Armed Forces. It served in the Vietnam War and Operation Desert Storm and has participated in numerous other combat and support missions.

The Museum of Flight's Prowler flew with Electronic Attack Squadron VAQ-134 (“Garudas”), which was based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington. Following the Navy’s decision to replace its Grumman Prowlers with Boeing EA-18G Growlers, the National Naval Aviation Museum offered this Prowler to The Museum of Flight on long-term loan. This EA-6B was officially decommissioned on May 27, 2015, following its final active-duty flight – to The Museum of Flight – where the Prowler became the first electronic-warfare aircraft to go on display.

This aircraft loan courtesy of the National Naval Aviation Museum at Pensacola, Florida.

Serial Number:
161884
Wingspan:
53.00 ft
Length:
59 ft 10 in
Height:
16 ft 3 in
Wing Area:
528.90 ft²
Empty Weight:
32,162 lbs
Gross Weight:
65,000 lbs
Maximum Speed:
658 mph
Power Plant:
Two Pratt & Whitney J52-P-408 turbojets of 11,200-lb static thrust each
Range:
2,021 miles