The William E. Boeing Sr. Materials Held At The Museum of Flight
0000.00.07.Boeing

 Primary Sources & Personal Library

Summary Information

Repository
Museum of Flight Archives
Title
William E. Boeing Sr. Collections
ID
0000.00.07.Boeing
Date
20th Century
Extent
15.0 Linear feet , consisting of one Hollinger Box and one flat file box of oversized items stored in the Archives. The Library collection is stored together in the Rare Book Room and a number of objects are on display on the first floor of the Red Barn.
Language
English
William E Boeing Sr. Materials General Description
The materials cataloged in this finding aid are specific to William E. Boeing Sr. and cover the Aircraft Company anecdotally. The finding aid include items from the Boeing family as well as other materials collected by the museum that relate to Mr. Boeing and his life. A number of objects, archival materials and Mr. Boeing’s library were donated to the museum by the Boeing family. Other materials have joined the collection as part of other donations or purchases including a number of photographs and some film footage. Most of the material dates from circa 1909 up to circa 1930, with a few miscellaneous items dating from the 1940’s.

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William E. Boeing Biography

William Edward Boeing (1881-1956) started his professional life as a lumberman and ended as a real-estate developer and horse breeder, but in between he founded the company that brought forth important breakthroughs in the field of aviation technology and the airline business. The Boeing Airplane Company became one of the signature corporations of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest and dominated the regional economy for most of the twentieth century.

Early Years

William Edward Boeing was born on October 1, 1881, in Detroit, Michigan, the first child of William Boeing and Marie Ortmann. Boeing's father, Wilhelm Boing, a veteran of the Austro-Prussian War, emigrated to the United States in 1868 from North Rhine-Westphalia. He carried letters of introduction to German families in Detroit, but no money. After working on a farm, in a lumberyard, and in a hardware store, he was hired by Karl Ortmann, an important local lumberman from Vienna.

Boing married Ortmann's daughter and, five years later, started his own business. He was soon selling land, timber, and iron ore at huge profits and providing extraordinarily well for his wife, Marie, and two children, William and Caroline. Wilhelm Anglicized his name to William Boeing, built a stately home in Detroit's best neighborhood, acquired the city's finest library of German literature, and, in 1883, helped fund Detroit's first art museum. While in New York on business, Wilhelm Boeing contracted influenza. He died during the long trainride back to Detroit.

His son, William, was 8 years old. Marie Boeing married a Virginia physician and left Detroit. Young William, who did not get along with his stepfather, was sent to several prestigious boarding schools, including the Sellig Brothers School in Vevey, Switzerland -- the same school New York financier J. P. Morgan had attended 30 years earlier. Boeing attended a prep school in Boston to ready him for Yale University. He entered Yale in the engineering department of the Sheffield Scientific School.

After a year shy of completing the three-year program, he dropped out to seek his fortune saying later, "I felt the time was ripe to acquire timber." He decided on Washington state, even though he knew little about business opportunities in the Northwest and even less about timbering in the vast "Evergreen State." America was undergoing growth spurt and the nation demanded lumber for new homes and businesses and ambitious industrialists were reaping millions out of the seemingly limitless stands of cedar, spruce, hemlock, and Doug-fir.

Lumberman

In 1902, Boeing traveled by steamer to Hoquiam, Washington, on Grays Harbor, and moved in with a friend, J. H. Hewitt, who had good connections in the timber industry. Within a short time, Boeing started the Greenwood Timber Company and the Boeing & McCrimmon Company. He was soon in touch with George Long, head of operations at Weyerhaeuser, trying to arrange land deals with the much larger company. Boeing left Hoquiam for Seattle in 1908 and the tall, bespectacled, mustached bachelor moved into an apartment on fashionable First Hill. He joined the University Club, an exclusive venue for college-trained men on their way up the Northwest business ladder.

In 1910, Boeing traveled with friends to southern California to witness America's first International Air Meet at Dominguez Hills. Excited by what he saw, he approached one of the show's stars, the French aviator Louis Paulhan, and pressed him for a ride. Paulhan told the man he had to be patient. After four days of waiting, Boeing lost his chance when Paulhan left in a rush.

Flying High

George Conrad Westervelt (1880-1956) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, where he earned the nickname "Scrappy" for his ability to argue any subject. In 1910, after studying naval engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westervelt served as an official Navy observer at one of America’s first air meets, in New York. Unlike many of his Navy colleagues, he was impressed with the new technology.

In about 1911, the Navy sent Westervelt to Seattle to inspect submarines being built at the Moran Brothers shipyard on the Duwamish River. He joined the prestigious Rainier Club and the University Club, where he met William Boeing. The two bachelors became friends, finding a shared enthusiasm for flying.

But five years passed before Boeing had another chance to take his first flight. When aviator Terah Maroney landed on Lake Union in 1915, Boeing and Westervelt stood in line and took several flights each. They had to sit on the wing and hold on to the leading edge while Maroney' old Curtiss airplane skipped across the choppy water and into the sky.

Exhilarated, Boeing decided to take lessons at the Glenn L. Martin Flying School in Los Angeles and he purchased one of Martin's planes. Martin pilot Floyd Smith traveled to Seattle to assemble Boeing's new Martin TA hydroaeroplane and to teach its owner to fly. Huge crates arrived by train, and Smith assembled the plane in a tent hangar erected on the shore of Lake Union. William Boeing became a pilot.

In 1915, World War I was raging in Europe, Africa, and Asia. Safe behind two oceans, most Americans did not feel threatened by the conflict, but William Boeing was one of a growing segment of the U.S. population that advocated "preparedness." Fourteen men and five women had formed the Aero Club of the Northwest in the Ladies' Annex of the University Club on August 24, 1915. William Boeing was elected president. From that point on, he was an ardent advocate for National Preparedness. He was also interested in the ideas of Henry Woodhouse, editor of Flying magazine, who had written, "With 5,000 aviators, this country would be in the position of the porcupine, which goes about its daily pursuits, harms no one, but is ever ready to defend itself."

In November 1915, Boeing spent a busy week in his new "hydroaeroplane." With test pilot and mechanic Herb Munter as his passenger, the lumberman flew to Tacoma and back to Seattle. He dropped cardboard "bombs" on a crowded California-Washington football game at the University of Washington to prove that Americans were vulnerable to foreign attack. One of the cardboard messages read:

"Protection Through Preparedness. This harmless card in the hands of a hostile foe might have been a bomb dropped upon you. Aeroplanes are your defense!!!! Aero Club of the Northwest."

That same year, even before becoming disappointed with his Martin TA, Boeing asked Westervelt to design a better seaplane. Westervelt wrote later, "I knew so little about the subject, so little about the difficulties involved, that I agreed to undertake it."

Airplane Builder

William Boeing and Conrad Westervelt believed they could build a better airplane than the Martin floatplane. For enhanced stability during landing and takeoff, they replaced the TA's single pontoon with two pontoons and two outriggers. Westervelt threw himself into the project, contacting every manufacturer he could find. Boeing and Westervelt chose Ed Heath to construct the pontoons at Boeing's boatyard on the Duwamish River. But shortly after Boeing's workers began work on the B&W -- for Boeing and Westervelt -- the Navy transferred Westervelt to the East Coast. He returned for a few weeks in August 1916 to help organize Boeing's new enterprise, Pacific Aero Products Co., which he aptly illustrated on a piece of drafting vellum.

Boeing and the tiny U.S. aviation community pressed the U.S. government to invest in airplane production and pilot training. An early Aero Club plan included Hydro-Aero stations positioned every 100 miles along the U.S. coastline, with at least 15 men and two planes each. They could protect the country by searching for enemy submarines and aiding the Coast Guard's search-and-rescue efforts.

Technical Challenges

Before Westervelt went east early in 1916, he arranged for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to review his structural drawings and to test a model in its wind tunnel. William Boeing proceeded with assistance from Herb Munter and shop foreman Joseph Foley, who sent weekly reports to Westervelt. The boatyard's standard of woodworking disappointed Boeing, who also insisted on reduced weight. Other change orders included an improved wing; ailerons on the top wing only; and larger vertical tail surfaces.

Boeing ordered construction of the fuselage at his company's seaplane hangar and factory on Lake Union. There employees assembled Boeing Airplane Model 1, also known as the B&W, and christened it the Bluebill. On June 29, 1916, the B&W flew for the first time. Eventually, Boeing sold the Bluebill and its sister aircraft, the Mallard, to the New Zealand Flying School of Auckland. Neither aircraft survives today, but a replica hangs in The Museum of Flight’s Great Gallery.

Founding a Company

On July 15, 1916, less than a month after the B&W's first flight, William Boeing incorporated his airplane-building business as Pacific Aero Products Company. Already a shrewd businessman, Boeing outlined his ambitions in the articles of incorporation. One of the articles allowed the firm to "... engage in a general manufacturing business and to manufacture goods, wares and merchandise of every kind, especially to manufacture aeroplanes ... and all patterns thereof." William Boeing transferred ownership of four of his aircraft -- two B&Ws, a C-4, and the Martin TA, as well as associated property -- to his company. On April 18, 1917, he changed the name to Boeing Airplane Company.

Before joining the Boeing Airplane Company, Edward "Eddie" Hubbard had already established his prowess as a pilot: The Aero Club of America had issued hydroaeroplane license no. 45 to him in 1915 after he flew figure eights around two pylons 500 yards apart and completed an unpowered landing. Americans celebrated the end of World War I in a big way on November 11, 1918. Hubbard marked the festivities by taking Boeing officials on stunt rides above downtown Seattle; engineer Louis Marsh rode through two loops. In early 1919, when the 91st Division returned to the Northwest from Europe for a parade in Seattle, Hubbard's air show delighted the crowd for 30 minutes.

An Industry Grows

William Boeing and Eddie Hubbard made aviation history in March 1919 when they flew to Vancouver, British Columbia, picked up mail and delivered it back to Seattle -- almost. Halfway through the trip’s northbound leg, snow forced an overnight stop in Anacortes. On the return trip, low fuel forced the duo to land 25 miles north of Seattle.

Boeing kept his company alive after World War I by building furniture and speedboats (popular on Puget Sound during Prohibition) and with personal checks. Military and naval contracts tipped the scales toward survival beginning in 1921. When the Congress gave up on the Post Office flying the mail (with 31 of the first 40 pilots killed) in 1925, and passed legislation to contract with private firms, commercial aviation became viable. Air Mail contracts made passenger airplanes possible. Eddie Hubbard convinced Boeing to get into the Air Mail business in addition to building the planes. Mail revenues of Boeing Air Transport underwrote passenger service and the development of navigational aids and airports. Airline operations justified the opening of the Boeing School of Aeronautics in Oakland, California, in 1929. By 1928, Boeing Air Transport held 30 percent of air mail and air passenger market in the United States.

But competitors threatened this share through consolidation. Boeing accepted an offer in 1929 to merge his airline and manufacturing business with engine supplier Pratt & Whitney, forming United Aircraft & Transport Corporation. Boeing became chairman of the board. Boeing Air Transport folded into United Air Lines.

Backlash

In 1930, U.S. Postmaster General Walter Brown used new legislation to modify airmail contracts in an infamous series of meetings with airline executives later called "the Spoils Conferences." By 1933, four enormous holding companies, among them United Aircraft and Transport, dominated American aviation at all levels. Despite the worldwide economic depression beginning in 1929, the airline and airplane business flourished and by 1933 the public and politicians resented what they viewed as corporate profiteering. The Democratic Congress, supporting Franklin D. Roosevelt"s administration, sought corporate scapegoats. William Boeing and United Aircraft & Transportation Corporation, along with the three other aviation giants, were convenient targets. President Roosevelt's reaction, over the protests of his Postmaster General Jim Farley, was to cancel all the airmail contracts and turn the Air Mail over to the Army Air Corps in February 1934.

In the first five weeks, 12 inexperienced and ill-equipped Army pilots died. William Boeing, who knew that he and his companies were innocent of any wrongdoing and were being unfairly sanctioned, agreed to testify before a Senate investigating committee chaired by Alabama Democrat Hugo Black. During the session, several congressman attacked Boeing personally, and the Seattle businessman became very bitter. Although the investigation revealed that neither the airline executives nor Postmaster Brown had done anything wrong, the Congress passed legislation banning aircraft manufacturers from owning or being owned by airmail carriers. Individuals who had attended the Spoils Conferences were specifically forced out of their jobs.

United Aircraft & Transport was divided into three main parts -- United Aircraft absorbed Pratt & Whitney, Sikorsky Aviation, and Hamilton-Standard Propeller; United Air Lines retained the airline; and Boeing Aircraft Company secured Stearman Aircraft in Wichita, Kansas, Boeing in Seattle, and Boeing in Canada.

William Boeing was already three years past a self-imposed plan to retire at age 50. He returned to the Northwest to sell his stock in United Aircraft & Transportation Corporation. Except for acting as a consultant during World War II, he never again took an active interest in the company bearing his name. The same year that the federal government forced Boeing out of the aviation business, he received the Daniel Guggenheim Medal for notable achievements in aeronautics, only the sixth man to be so honored. Aviation pioneer Orville Wright had received the first Guggenheim.

After the Aircraft Business

William Boeing turned to other business pursuits including real estate, Wall Street, and horse breeding and racing. He and his wife became regulars at the nation's race courses such as Saratoga in New York. Their Air Chute won the Premier Handicap at Hollywood Park in 1938, and Slide Rule took third in the 1943 Kentucky Derby.

In 1909, Boeing was accepted by other owners to become a resident of The Highlands, an exclusive enclave three miles north of Seattle on Puget Sound and limited to 100 families. The Brookline, Massachusetts, landscape architecture firm of the Olmsted Brothers designed the streets and parks. Boeing bought 16 acres on Boeing Creek where in 1913 he built a mansion designed by Seattle architect Charles Bebb. Boeing occupied the home by himself until 1921 when he married Bertha Potter Paschall. The newlyweds were joined by Bertha’s sons, Nathaniel Jr. and Cranston. Their son, William E. Boeing Jr. was born in 1923.

Boeing enjoyed horse racing, golf, fishing, and boating. In 1930, he commissioned construction of the 125-foot Taconite (after the iron ore that helped build the family fortune) and he cruised Northwest and Canadian waters. A Douglas float plane ferried mail to the company executive. It was on one of these vacations that Boeing met bush pilot Clayton Scott at the fuel dock in Carter Bay, British Columbia. Boeing hired Scott to pilot the Douglas amphibian around the country. On their way back from the east coast bucking headwinds in 1938, Scott suggested that the seaplane was not really appropriate for transcontinental executive flying. Boeing said, "When we get to Los Angeles, why don't you look around for another airplane" (Tacoma News Tribune, June 6, 1997). The result was the purchase of a demo model of Douglas's new twin-engine DC-5.

Boeing supported charitable organizations, one of which was Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle. During the Great Depression, more than 90 percent of the care Children's delivered was free, which left the hospital in the red. Each of those years, a committee of the women trustees went to Boeing, who wrote a personal check for the deficit -- on the condition that his involvement remained anonymous. His contributions were not revealed until more than 50 years after his death by which time Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center had become one of the top pediatric institutions in the nation.

In 1942, the Boeings bought property northwest of Fall City, Washington, where they built the 650-acre Aldarra Farm to breed horses. He donated his Highlands home to Children's Orthopedic Hospital in 1950. The Orthopedic sold the property to broadcasting entrepreneur Elroy McCaw. Both Boeing stepsons entered the aircraft manufacturing business and his son went into real estate. In 1947, Washington State College at Pullman awarded Boeing an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.

Conrad Westervelt never profited from his work with Boeing, but he continued to advance aviation in his Naval career. During World War I he supervised all Navy construction of aircraft. In 1919, he designed the NC-4 flying boat which became the first airplane to cross the Atlantic. Westervelt retired from the Navy as a captain and worked in aviation up to and through World War II. He died in Florida in 1956. William Boeing died of a heart attack aboard the Taconite on September 28, 1956, after a long period of failing health, just three days before his 75th birthday. According to his son, Boeing "pursued his curiosity, studied things carefully, and never dismissed the novel" (Seattle Post-Intelligencer). The Museum of Flight Staff, David Wilma & Historylink.org

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

 Museum of Flight Archives

9404 East Marginal Way South
Seattle, WA
206-764-5700
Archives@museumofflight.org

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Collection Inventory

 2005-10-6b William E Boeing Sr Archival Collection Early 20th Century   1.5 Cubic feet , consisting of 1 Hollinger Box of Telegrams, Night Mailgrams & Photos. 1 Document Box of Postcards & Philatelic materials. On display in the Red Barn are his pilot's helmet & a Mail Bag from the first International Mail Flight.

Arrangement of William E Boeing Materials

The correspondence and photos are stored in numbered file folders that correspond to the information given in the scope and content notes for each type.

Photographs

Folder 1 Photos On front - "Los Angeles 10-14 First 35 min flight -quite bumpy good practice", Boeing in plane - from scrapbook

Folder 2 Photos Boeing model 204A Dual Control flying boat specially built for WEB NC875E Young boy in boat

Folder 3 Photos Lumberyard, 2 men WEB & unidentified standing on cut logs possibly Hoquiam area (same person as in image 10)

Folder 4 Photos Boeing's Martin Seaplane taxiing prior to take-off probably on Lake Washington in October of 1915

Folder 5 Photos On back "return to D.E. Drew" - Boeing's Martin TA Seaplane in Tent Hanger on Lake Washington Probably Oct 1915

Folder 6 Photos On front - "Trial trip - 10/21/15 - Lake Washington - Martin Seaplane" - plane taking off from tent hangar Boeing's Martin TA Seaplane at Lake Washington in October of 1915 Same image as HS-143

Folder 6 Photos Duplicate of #6 but no writing on photo Boeing's Martin TA Seaplane at Lake Washington in October of 1915 Same image as HS-143

Folder 7 Photos "plane with 3 engines written on plane ""West Coast Air Transit"", plane at airfield, man standing in front of plane, plane # NC584K Fokker F-10 NC584K West Coast Air Transport (acquired by PAT Pacific Air Transport from WAE Western Air Express in 1929) probably BFI Boeing Field"

Folder 8 Photos Nathan C. Browne Fokker Universal "Lone Star" sitting on top of the ramp at the beginning of the failed Seattle to Tokyo flight

Folder 9 Photos Boeing Sea Plane Hanger on Lake Union, Young man and Young woman in front of Model 204, B-1 in foreground, another 204 in side of hangar

Folder 10 Photos WE Boeing on Right Unknown on Left (same person as in photo #3) In woods in front of steam engine at logging operation possibly Hoquiam area

Folder 11 Photos WE Boeing in Captain's uniform probably shortly after his arrival in PNW (note wire rim glasses and no Mustache)

Folder 12 Photos WE Boeing with unidentified in forest logging operation possibly in the Hoquiam area (person on right is same as in other logging photos)

Folder 13 Photos Circa 1903 entering Grays harbor on a steamer a very young WEB

Folder 14 Photos On back - "Uncle Rudie and WEB in Boston about 1897 before going to St. Paul's School" - young boy and older man standing on street (possibly refering to ST Paul's prep school in Concord NH)

Folder 15 Photos On back - "Air mail leaving Elko Nevada for NY - about July 1st 1927, 1st day of Boeing's operation of SF - Chicago Airmail" - biplane in desert taking off, model 40

Folder 16 Photos Loening of Cross-Sound Air Ferries operation run by Gorst

Folder 17 Photos Reprint - 8x10 - man in suit and pilot standing in office reading a tape in front chalkboard wall with list of airports and weather conditions, maps on other walls, Boeing Co. Photo

Folder 18 Photos Reprint - 8x10 - man at radio wearing headphones, cartoon on back wall with pilot in plane saying "pilot Jones Boeing plane 286 eastbound what are weather conditions ahead" Boeing Photos

Folder 19 Photos reprint 8x10 - on back "original airplane of WE Boeing - purchases from Glenn L. Martin" - Martin Seaplane in water

Folder 20 Photos "Two of Boeing's very successful race horse's Slide Rule & Devil's Thumb with Pony. Slide Rule finished 3rd in the 1943 Kentucky Derby, Won the 1943 Peter Pan Stakes, The Westchester & the Jerome at Belmont, as well as the 1943 Fred Cappy Capossela and the Interborough Handicap at Aqueduct. Devils Thumb won the 1942 Saratoga Hopeful as well as the Sanford. Owner: WEB Jockey: Conn McCreary, Breeder: Claiborne Farm, Trainer: Cecil Wilhelm

Folder 21 Photos On back - "4pm to Mrs. Stehle (Bill) Russ Blk - Sat" - portrait of the young business man William Boeing seated.

Folder 22 Photos "WEB Sr with his sister Caroline in the Hotel Del Monte Donkey cart in August 9 1892

Folder 23 Photos WEB Martin TA Seaplane in the water at Lake Washington Tent Hanger

Folder 24 Photos "Eric Nelson - up Boeing" Amelia Earheart sitting on steps from United Plane, with Mrs.Bertha Boeing on Right and Eric Nelson on her left Boeing Photo

Folder 25 Photos in folder, large reproduction, portrait of Boeing in later years, Color portrait Folder 26 Photos "Institut Sillig in Vevey on Lake Geneva in Switzerland 1894. Boeing is seated in the front row, forth from the left Well known (at the time) boarding school particularly known for language, exposure to European Culture and winter sports. Other alumni included JP Morgan and Cyrus Vance"

Folder 27 Photos Photo on cardboard, below photo "At Hotel Del Monte August 9, 1892 California" WEB Sr at the Hotel Del Monte August 9 1892

Folder 28 Photos On back - "Angell photographer East Saginaw Mich - opposite Everett House" portrait of Boeing's father Whilhelm

Folder 29 Photos On back - "Angell photographer East Saginaw Mich - opposite Everett House" portrait of Boeing's Mother Marie Ortman Boeing

Folder 30 Photos On front - "Martin TA Seaplane in flight over Lake Washington 10-21-15" plane in sky

Folder 31 Photos WEB Yacht Taconite close up

Folder 32 Photos Monomail Boeing - X725W in flight

Folder 33 Photos 5 Boeing P-12 biplanes in formation, flying over mountains, military planes

Folder 34 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, but did not - tons of walrus carcasses piled up in the snow

Folder 35 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - dead walrus on it's back

Folder 36 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - two deal Walruses in the snow

Folder 37 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - dead polar bear being hauled into a boat by it's hind legs

Folder 38 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - several dead walruses in the snow

Folder 39 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - side of a mountain with one or two houses and many hides drying on wooden frames

Folder 40 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - natives (Inuits?) holding guns and spears posing behind 2 rows of dead walruses

Folder 41 Photos 3 men standing at base of extremely large tree - giant cedar? Redwood

Folder 42 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - man sitting on pile of walruses carcasses and smiling

Folder 43 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - dead body wrapped up in cloth and up on wooden poles in tundra

Folder 4 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - teepee made of long wooden sticks

Folder 45 Photos From a trip to far north Alaska that Boeing was supposed to go on, Great Bear Expedition, but did not - native man and woman (Inuits?)

Folder 46 Photos Photo Album - 4 photos glued on album pages duplicates of other Lake Washington Tent Hanger Photos

Folder 47 Photos from scrapbook - WE Boeing Portrait Young Seattle Businessman

Folder 48 Photos from scrapbook - biplane in sky

Folder 49 Photos from scrapbook - Martin Seaplane on water

Folder 50 Photos from scrapbook - Martin TA Seaplane taxing into tent hangar on water, man standing and watching

Folder 51 Photos From scrapbook - WE Boeing' Martin TA Seaplane taxiing up to tent hanger on Lake Washington

Folder 52 Photos From scrapbook - Bill Boeing Sr. In his Martin TA on Lake Union or Lake Washington

Folder 53 Photos from scrapbook - Crew of the WEB yacht Taconite

Folder 54 Photos from scrapbook - Boeing and his camera on board a yacht (taking a photo of the photographer

Folder 55 Photos from scrapbook - photo postcard The WEB yacht Taconite probably up in British Columbia

Folder 56 Photos from scrapbook - The Red Barn while still Ed Heath's ship yard

Folder 57 Photos from scrapbook - The yacht the Dorothy S out of Tacoma

Folder 58 Photos from scrapbook - Boeing House in the Highlands of Seattle Designed by Charles Bebb and completed in 1914 The House was named Aldarra"

Folder 59 Photos from scrapbook - Boeing's Martin TA Seaplane In flight over Lake Washington

Folder 60 Photos from scrapbook -Two aircraft in flight over Lake Washington, WE Boeing in his Martin TA and what appears to be some kind of Curtiss aircraft.

Folder 61 Photos from scrapbook - on back - "Packard car 1909" - Boeing in car on street with Queen Anne style houses in background Circa 1909 with new Packard WEB in Seattle or Hoquiam

Folder 62 Photos Boeing's Martin Taxiing away from the tent hangers on Lake Washington same image as in Folder 6

Folder 64 Photos Interior of Boeing Tent Hanger on Lake Washington

Folder 63 Photos Boeing's Martin TA taxiing away on Lake Washington

Folder 65 Photos Floyd Smith at Boeing's tent hanger on Lake Washington 1915

Folder 66 Photos Boeing's Martin TA In Flight over Lake Washington

Folder 67 Photos The Yacht Wigeon

Folder 68 Photos photos from scrapbook - WE Boeing with Edward Gott (?) on board a yacht.

Folder 193 Photo c. 1920's? Photo of Boeing and a man sitting on boxes on a field in front of several cars, in an envelope with "Mr. Boeing" on the front and "Egtvedt" on the upper left corner

Philatelic Materials

Philatelic

Folder #1 Serial – “Air Mail Collector” Vol. I No.3 January 1929 Whole No. 3 / Franked “Boeing Air Transport Inc. Jan 3 1929 San Francisco CAL”

Folder #2 Envelope – 1 business size envelope from WEB office to “Billie” (empty)

Folder #3 Airline Timetable – China National Aviation Corp. (CNAC) in Chinese circa 1933, Shanghai-Chungking Route (Douglas Dolphin on Cover)

Folder #4 Admission Card & Ticket Booklet – 1 Metal Admission card to the 1930 National Air Races for Exclusive Admission to Aeronautical Concourse Aug 23-Sep 1 Chicago Ill / Glued to the back of a booklet of admission tickets to same at Curtiss-Reynolds Airport.

Folder #5 Souvenir Folder – Souvenir Folder of Views from the 1910 Los Angeles Air Meet / Fold-out interior section shows prints of participants (created before event)

Folder #6 Envelope & Silk Bookmark – Envelope with typed note “Mr. Boeing / Picture of Eddie Hubbard / Bookmark from Fabric of Balloon ‘Explorer II’ autographed by Captain A. W. Stevens” / Bookmark – From National Geographic Society / Silk from balloon with autograph of Stevens glued to paper backing with information about the flight.

Folder #7 Photo – B&W photo of Eddie Hubbard standing in front of Boeing C-700/CL-4S plane at the Boeing seaplane hanger around the time of the 1919 mail flight.

Folder #8 Photos – 9 B&W Photos taken by Pierson Studio: 2 photos of Eddie Hubbard / 1 photo of Eddie Hubbard & WEB with C-700/CL-4S / 3 Copies of CL-4S Taxiing on Lake Union (P105) / 2 Copies of WEB & Mr. Berlin (P107) All take August 6, 1918.

Folder #9 Autograph, Letter & Envelope – Orville Wright autograph / Envelope from John Heise Autographs of Syracuse NY to Mr. GD Stoops / Letter, original letter to Heise from Stoops to purchase Orville & Wilbur Wright autographs dated 5-8-1930 – Postscript from Heise to Stoops about sending autographs in envelope with Civil Aeronautics Conference of 1928 stamps.

Folder #10 Photograph, Price List, Receipt – 1 B&W photograph 1-25-1929 with attached Caption sheet purchased from Henry Miller News Picture Service / Receipt for photo / Price List for reprints from Henry Miller – Photo is of “Coolidge thanked for aid in developing aviation by Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce Delegation. (See AT record for full listing of people in photo)

Folder #11 Envelope & Letter – Letter on Stanford University Letterhead dated November 17, 1928, from Herbert Hoover Jr to WEB Sr thanking him for tour of plant. Mention upheaval in house (probably due to preparations to move to Washington for inauguration of Herbert Hoover who’d just won the presidency)

Folder #12 Commemorative Cover & Card 1938 – Envelope Illustration depicts the “Great Trek” of 1838 by the Voortrekker (Pioneers) from Cape Town to Pretoria South Africa. Envelope created to celebrate the Centenary of the Great Trek and was sent for 1000 miles by ox cart and then completed the journey by air (to WEB?). Sent to WEB Sr. by Merl La Voy c/o US Consulate in Johannesburg South Africa. Number of South African Stamps from 1938

Folder #13 Letter from Wilbur Wright – Wright Brothers Stationary: To a Mr. H.A. Toulmin Springfield Ohio August 29, 1910 (Toulmin was Wright’s attorney on Patent case) “Dear Sir I am enclosing herewith a plate showing the Henson machine. We have no copy of the patent. Yours Truly, Wilbur Wright” Handwritten note in ink in what appears to be Wilbur Wrights handwriting “and the adjustable truss wires on the spars of the wings”. Handwritten note in pencil in different hand “the first airplane” (possibly the Wilbur Wright autograph mentioned above? Kw)

The Following Items All Are Associated With the First International Air Mail Flight Between Vancouver BC & Seattle WA

Folder #14 Letter – 28th Feb 1919 Vancouver Board of Trade Letterhead To WEB from Canadian Official Great War Exhibit / congratulations on first flight letter written so it could be carried on flight. (It different type at bottom postscript indicating it was carried on the flight)

Folder #15 Letter & Cover – 28th Feb 1919 Vancouver Board of Trade Letterhead TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN Letter certifying that WEB arrived in Vancouver on the 28th at 1.1.5pm by seaplane from Seattle making 1st international flight between the two cities. Flight made on behalf of Canadian Official Great War Exhibit. Signed by officer of that event. Cover is addressed to WEB from Dept of Publicity & Industries in BC cachet is for “VIA AIRPLANE MAIL First Flight Vancouver BC to Seattle” typewritten at bottom “Via Sea-plane driven by WE Boeing”

Folder #16 Letters (2) – (Paper clipped together) 1) From Ole Hanson Mayor of Seattle Feb 15, 1919 addressed to “Our Neighbors Across the Line” (carried on flight from Seattle to Vancouver before mail flight). 2) 6 March 1919 Vancouver Board of Trade Letterhead, returning Ole Hanson letter to WEB

Folder #17 Letter & Cover – On Hotel Vancouver Letterhead, March 3, 1919 cachet is for “VIA AIRPLANE MAIL First Flight Vancouver BC to Seattle” To WEB from J.S. Patterson “enjoyed visit …arranging for Patsy to have such a wonderful flight…”

Folder #18 Letter & Cover – Mayor of Vancouver Office Letterhead, Feb 28, 1919 cachet is for “VIA AIRPLANE MAIL First Flight Vancouver BC to Seattle” To WEB from Acting Mayor Woodside “congratulation to sister city of Seattle”

Folder #19 Letter & Cover – Mayor of Vancouver Office Letterhead, Feb 10, 1919 cachet is handwritten “From Vancouver BC via Airplane” To WEB from Mayor (stamped, not signed with signature)

Folder #20 Way Bill of Mail – Canada Post Office Way Bill of Mail Despatched from Vancouver BC by Hydro-Airplane at 12:45 o’clock PM on the 3rd day of March 1919 Signed by Despatching Officer Macphearson and Aviating Officer Boeing Handwritten: Received Seattle PO March 3, 1919 4:20pm signed by CM Perkins Supt Mails

Folder #21 Receipt of Mail – USPS Office of the Postmaster Seattle March 3 1919 Address to WEB acknowledging receipt of one sack of mail. Signed by Postmaster

Folder #22 Copies – Photostatic Copies of envelope and Waybill & “To Whom It May Concern” letter (4 pieces)

End of First Flight Vancouver to Seattle Materials

Folder #23 Letter and Cover – Letter from WEB to Editor of the Victoria BC Colonist newspaper May 19, 1919 on The New Washington Hotel Letterhead “souvenir” of first mail flight between Seattle & Victoria BC. Cover is not stamped hand written across the top “Via First Air Mail Seattle to Victoria Carried by Lts Rideout & Brown. (See Eddie Hubbard Book pgs 49 to 53)

First Flight Seattle to Victoria/Victoria to Seattle Oct 15 1920 by Eddie Hubbard in the Boeing CL-4S

Folder #24 Covers – 2 Envelopes for first flight of FAM.2 Seattle to Victoria BC Oct 15, 1920. Both addressed to Mr. JA Rithet of Rithet & Company Victoria BC on WEB Letterhead.

Folder #25 Cover – 1 Envelope from 1st return flight of FAM.2 Victoria to Seattle Oct 15, 1920. Addressed to WEB from Rithet & Company.

End of First flight Seattle to Victoria & Return Materials

Folder #26 Cover & Letter – Cover is stamped “First Transcontinental Non-stop Flight with Air Mail in the Boeing Hornet Shuttle – Aerial Refueling documentation.

Folder #27 Postcards – 2 “Via Air Mail” Postcards Addressed to WEB sent from Des Moines Iowa. One signed by WA Patterson, one signed by RF Ahrens

Folder #28 Covers – 2 Envelopes stamped “Inauguration trip of the Five Cent Air Mail” Sent from Black & Bigelow in New York to WEB August 1, 1928

Folder #29 Airgram November 28, 1928 Salt Lake City – From WEB Sr to Mrs. WEB written during flight from San Francisco to Salt Lake. Describes record load of mail 773 pounds and fellow passengers all pilots for BAT and Standard Oil to be dropped off along the route.

Folder #30 Airgram November 29, 1928 Cheyenne – From WEB Sr to Mrs. WEB written during flight from Salt Lake to Cheyenne describes delay in flight while waiting for weather to clear over Sherman Hill.

Folder #31 July 1 1927 Chicago to San Francisco Covers Airmail Covers – 3 – First Flight Transcontinental Mail Westbound Chicago to San Francisco July 1 1927 on Hotel Fontenelle Omaha, Neb Letterhead. One each to Mr. WEB, Mrs. WEB, Master Bebo Boeing. First Flight Cache and postmarked Omaha

Folder #32 Airmail Covers – 7 -- First Flight Transcontinental Mail Westbound Chicago to San Francisco July 1 1927 on Boeing Air Transport Letterhead. First Flight Cache and postmarked Salt Lake City. Reverse Cache Chicago July 2nd. All carried by Hugh Barker, all addressed to WEB via Phil Johnson at the Morrison Hotel Chicago IL

Other Airmail Covers Folder #33 Feb 2 1927 Airmail from Washington DC to Seattle From Chicago via Pasco

Folder #34 April 30 1931 First Flight A. M Route 4 from United Airport Burbank CA also stamped WAE Western Air Express & BAT. Contains Rack card for United Airport Los Angeles.

Folder #35 July 1 ? on first trip of through schedule involving night flying on Transcontinental Air Mail Route. To WEB from Glenn Martin Company. Postmarked Cleveland

Folder #36 August 20, 1935 First Air Mail Stratosphere Flight US Air Mail Route No. 2 non-stop coast to coast Transcontinental & Western. Carried on the Winnie Mae by Wiley Post (not signed) to Mr. & Mrs. WEB postmarked Los Angeles. On verso stamped to indicate carried on first four flights.

Folder #37 Oct 18, 1937 First Day Cover via Air Mail from San Francisco, postmarked Honolulu Hawaii addressed to Hudson’s Bay Company Vancouver, B.C. Canada

Folder #38 May 10, 1937 25th Anniversary flight cover for Glenn Martin Flight from Newport CA to Avalon CA. Postmarked May 10, 1937. Includes form letter

Folder #39 May 19 1938 Clay Center Nebraska anniversary cover for Glenn Martin and first mail flight to Clay center

Folder #40 May 20, 1938 Macksburg IA Airmail Week Cover (Birthplace of Glenn Martin)

Folder #41 March 30, 1938 Vancouver BC to Seattle Air Mail Field to Pasadena CA

Folder #42 May 18, 1938 WE Boeing Letterhead to WE Boeing Jr. Pasadena CA Seattle National Air Mail Week Cachet

Folder #43 May 8, 1938 - 3 copies – WE Boeing Letterhead to WE Boeing Jr. Pasadena CA, Fairbanks Alaska to White Horse Canada 1st Flight Cover

Folder #44 May 8 1938 – 2 copies -- WE Boeing Letterhead to WE Boeing Jr. Pasadena CA, White Horse Canada to Juneau Alaska 1st Flight Cover

Folder #45 May 8 1938 – 3 copies-- WE Boeing Letterhead to WE Boeing Jr. Pasadena CA, Juneau to White Horse 1st Flight Cover

Folder #46 June 20 1940 – First Flight FAM route 20 – From WE Boeing to WE Boeing Jr

Folder #47 June 22 1940 – Seattle Juneau Air Mail FAM 20 – To Mrs. WE Boeing Contains note (illegible signature)

Folder #48 July 4 1942 – Carried on first flight of the Martin Mars – Glenn L. Martin Co to MR WE Boeing

Folder #49 Oct 1 1946 – Demonstration Flight Flying Post Office Enroute LA – New York – Boston – From Douglas Aircraft Company to WE Boeing

Folder #50 Dec 5 1946 – US Air Mail First Flight AM 77 – West Coast Airlines to WE Boeing, director Pacific National Bank

Folder #51 June 21 1974 – 3 copies - First Flight AM 3 from Bozeman Montana on Northwest Orient Airlines – WEB Jr Letterhead to WEB Jr

Folder #52 June 27 1941 – Initial flight of Douglas B-19 bomber – to Mr. & Mrs. WE Boeing (includes letter)

Folder #53 May 19 1938 – 4 copies - First National Air Mail Week Kitty Hawk NC – WE Boeing Letterhead to various

Folder #54 May 29 1953 – 2 copies – First Day of Issue 50th Anniversary of Powered Flight Stamp – WEB Letterhead

Folder #55 June 3 1930 – Via Airmail – From Post Office Dept Official Business – by authority of Superintendent of Contract air Mail Service (with signature) to WEB Chairman of the Board of BAT. Congratulations on BAT flying 10 million miles.

Folder #56 3 Covers: Oct 5 1935 – Letter carried from San Francisco on first Flight Westbound to Guam on PAA Clipper then first Flight Eastbound from Guam on PAA Clipper. Includes to 6 cent and one 3 cent stamp /Oct 5 1935 – Letter carried from Seattle on first Flight Westbound to Guam on PAA Clipper then first Flight Eastbound from Guam on PAA Clipper. 1 to WEB Jr &1 to Mrs. WEB

Folder #57 Dec 5 1935 – First Flight Honolulu to San Francisco via airmail to WEB on Inter-Island Airways Letterhead

Folder #58 Dec 5 1935 – First Flight Honolulu to San Francisco via airmail to WEB JR on Halekulani Letterhead – includes blank letterhead paper

Folder #59 Dec 5 1935 – First Flight Honolulu to San Francisco via airmail to WEB on “Via Trans-Pacific Air Mail” enclosure.

Folder #60 Mar 13 1939 – Boeing Clipper Inaugural Flight – Cachet is Stamp club of the Honolulu Advertiser – to Mrs. WEB

Folder #61 Oct 8 1934 – First Flight Air Mail Wailuku Maui

Folder #62 Nov 22 1935 – Manila Air Mail UAL – PAA First transcontinental – transpacific air mail flight – to WEB jr on WEB letterhead - includes letter to WEB jr from Drew

Folder #63 Oct 8 1934 – First Air mail flight from Hilo to Honolulu

Folder #64 Oct 8 1934 – First Flight from Honolulu to Hilo

Folder #65 Apr 22 1935—First Flight PAA Clipper California to Hawaii & First Flight PAA Clipper Hawaii California

Folder #66 May 28 1937 – Primeiro Voo Correio (first flight via airmail) PAA Macau to USA – Trans-Pacific Air Mail – Boeing 314 Letterhead to Billy Boeing

Folder #67 May 28 1937 – Primeiro Voo Correio (first flight via airmail) PAA Macau to USA – Pan American Airways Co to WEB Includes Letter from Parker Van Zandt

Folder #68 May 23 1939 – Par premier Service Aerien France – Etats Unis ( first flight from France to United States) - From Thomas F. Hamilton General European Rep for United Aircraft Corporation to WEB @ Santa Anita Race Track then to Harve de Grace Race Track in Maryland then to Delaware Park Race Track, Staunton MD – Includes letter from Hamilton to WEB

Folder #69 Aug 7 1928 – Par Avion – from Vicy Allier to New York then to Seattle via airmail – to Mrs. WEB from R. Ortman Bankers Trust Co

Folder #70 Oct 23 1933 – 2 copies - China National Aviation Corps First Flight Canton – Shanghai from Merl La Voy to WEB Includes note from La Voy on Hong Kong & Shanghai Hotel Letterhead

Folder #71 Sept 11 1930 – Postcard – Mit Luftschiff “Graf Zeppelin” Moskau – Friedrichschafen. (Very Rare)

Folder #72 Oct 28 1928 - First Flight via Airmail United States to Germany via Graff Zepppelin

Folder #73 Scrap – Piece of envelop with Thai (Siam) stamps

Folder #74 Mar 18, 1929 – Two covers via special flight Cristobal Canal Zone to Brownsville Texas carried by Captain Eaker - to WEB from General D. Bliss Postmaster for Canal Zone Includes informational letter to WEB

Folder #75 Feb 7 1929 – First Flight Cover from Canal Zone to USA carried by Lindberg. From E. S. Campbell from on board the USS Saratoga to WEB. Letter refers to flight activities of Boeing fighters from the Saratoga.

Folder #76 Covers – 3 envelopes all from “Flying” official publication of the Aero Club of America to WEB President of the Aero Club of the Northwest. 1 Envelope with 9-15-1918 First Trip New York to Chicago Aero Mail (with 16cent Jenny Stamp) / 2 Envelopes with Dec 12 1918 Chicago cancellation (with 6 cent Jenny Stamp)

Folder #77 - June 30, 1924 Letter to WEB from Glenn Martin on Martin Co. Letterhead about inauguration of continuous trans-continental Air Mail Service. Signed by Glenn Martin.

Correspondence Folders 1 to 100

Folder 1 Telegram 3/22/1916 Boeing to the Commandant at the US Naval Station in Pensacola, Fl re: when will Westerveldt arrive

Folder 2 Telegram 1/2/1916 from Boeing to Mr. C. Huiskamp c/o W.M. P. Horn

Folder 3 Telegram 12/27/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: asking about Atlantic Cruise

Folder 4 Telegram 12/18/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: Boeing's application to the Yacht Club

Folder 5 Telegram 12/16/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: correct address for Westerveldt so that Boeing can send him a shipment of crabs

Folder 6 Letter – typed 10/18/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: Dr. Suzzallo and Westerveldts design of the B&W machine

Folder 7 Letter – handwritten 10/5/1916 5 pages - Westerveldt to Boeing - can not read handwriting

Folder 8 Telegram 10/12/1916 2 pages - Westerveldt to Boeing re: trip to Wash. DC , Sturdivant to make 6 engines, dealings with the Aeromachine and Pacific Co. and Captain Jones

Folder 9 Letter – typed 10/17/1916 2 pages - Boeing to "my dear Westy" re: Captain Jones inspecting B&W machines (Jones was a classmate of Wong's) Boeing wants Westerveldt back in order to help sell machines to the Navy

Folder 10 Letter – typed 10/7/1916 3 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: update on sales to Jones (navy) , Dr. Suzzallo, new pontoons in the B&W #1

Folder 11 Letter – typed 9/28/1916 3 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: update on Jones coming to inspect the machines, Foley & Wong & Boeing talked to Dr. Suzzallo asking for advice on how to approach the Army & Navy- speculating that the Navy will want an aviation station on Puget Sound

Folder 12 Letter – typed 9/22/1916 Hansaker (navy) to Westerveldt re: sending Jones to Seattle to Boeing to look at planes

Folder 13 Letter – typed 9/26/1916 5 pages - Boeing to Westy re: Jones' visit, enjoyed Westy's visit

Folder 14 Letter – handwritten 9/23/191 2 pages - Westerveldt to Boeing - can not read handwriting

Folder 15 Letter – handwritten 9/11/1916 7 pages - Westerveldt to Boeing - can not read handwriting

Folder 16 Telegram 8/15/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: due in on train tonight

Folder 17 Telegram 8/3/1916 Boeing to Westy re: glad that Westerveldt is coming to visit

Folder 18 Telegram 8/2/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: coming to visit

Folder 19 Letter – typed 8/2/1916 Boeing to Morgan Davis re: money and dealings with Corn Exchange National Bank

Folder 20 Letter – handwritten No Date 10 pages - Westerveldt to Boeing - can not read handwriting

Folder 21 Telegram 8/1/1916 Boeing to Westy re: asking when Westerveldt can come to visit

Folder 22 Telegram 7/31/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: dates that W. can visit Seattle --

Folder 23 Telegram 7/29/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: trying to contact Polot Cooper (Pilot?)

Folder 24 Telegram 7/27/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: possible purchase of Hall-Scott Motor for less than $100, B. wants W's advice for the pilot B. has is unsatisfactory and thus wants W. to find a good pilot

Folder 25 Telegram 7/27/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: possible purchase of new Hall-Scott for $3,000 asking if B. wants it

Folder 26 Telegram 7/11/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. is back from BC Canada and wants to "raise the unit" but can not right now

Folder 27 Letter – typed 7/12/1916 3 pages - Morgan Davies to Boeing re: statement for services and resignation of Westerveldt from Navy

Folder 28 Note – handwritten No Date Boeing to Westerveldt re: handwritten copy of Telegram in folder 26

Folder 29 Telegram 7/11/1916 A notice stating the Boeing's telegram to Westerveldt was undeliverable

Folder 30 Telegram 7/1/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: idea of recruiting a regiment in WA, B. is to announce this idea if the President calls for volunteers

Folder 31 Telegram 7/1/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. likes the idea of a regiment

Folder 32 Telegram 6/29/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: if the President calls for volunteers w. will organize a regiment with his brother Bill as Col. W. as Lt. Col. and B. as Sr. Major

Folder 33a Letter – handwritten 6/24/1916 T. Wong to Westerveldt re: Wong wants to meet W. about a position with B, as the position was described to him by Hansaker

Folder 33b Letter – handwritten 6/21/1916 2 pages Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 34 Telegram 6/27/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: T Wong "…the chinaman twong…" currently in NY and will go to Seattle, bright man, needs travel funds from B., Martin is a qualified pilot, Cooper knows nothing about Martin

Folder 35 Letter – handwritten 6/2/1916 2 pages - Charles Pond (sp?) to Westerveldt re: Pond's experience as a pilot and his work for Curtiss, would like to work in Seattle for $200 per month

Folder 36 Telegram 6/23/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: Knox Martin a licensed pilot, suggest interest to Army in B.'s machines since Army has need for machines on land and water

Folder 37 Letter – typed 6/12/1916 2 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: employment of Martin, still B wants an additional pilot, communication with Davies regarding resignation (of W.?)

Folder 38 Telegram 6/12/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: hiring of Wong "…engage chinaman…", Martin is in Seattle looking for a job, B. wants W. to find information on Martin

Folder 39 Telegram 6/10/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: possibility of hiring Chairman (sic) immediately since he has other job offers

Folder 40 Letter – typed 6/9/1916 Davies to John Borden re: letter accompanying letters in reference to Westerveldt's resignation

Folder 41 Letter – typed 6/2/1916 2 pages - Morgan Davies to Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy, regarding Westerveldt's resignation

Folder 42 Letter – typed 6/2/1916 Davies to FDR, 1st Asst. Secretary to Navy, regarding Westerveldt's resignation

Folder 43 Letter - handwritten No Date Pages folded, writing on both sides - Westerveldt to Boeing - can not read handwriting

Folder 43 Telegram 6/10/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: W. is to take steps deemed advisable….

Folder 45 Telegram 6/3/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: W. is to see Chinese Naval Officer, and if "…favorable impressed…" is to hire him

Folder 46 Letter – typed 6/2/1916 2 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: hiring of Martin, 1st B&W is finished and B. is reluctant to make the first flight thus B. wants a pilot hired ASAP, wind tunnel installation costs

Folder 47 Letter – typed 5/29/1916 Davies to John Borden re: Westerveldt's resignation

Folder 48 Letter – typed 5/31/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: John Borden upset with the Secretary of the Navy regarding W.'s resignation

Folder 49 Telegram 5/31/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: John Borden and W.'s resignation

Folder 50 Telegram 6/2/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: Desambor Agent in Russian Gov. in NY looking to buy aircraft, B. has 3 now and can supply one a month, W. is to finalize details

Folder 51 Telegram 6/2/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing (1st page only) re: W. informed by Hansoker of young Chinese Naval officer that will finish his education soon and then be looking for a job

Folder 52 Telegram 6/2/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing (2nd page of telegram in folder #51) re: W. wants to know what B. would like him to tell the young Chinese Naval officer

Folder 53 Telegram 5/27/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: W. met Davies and is awaiting for word from Davies and B.

Folder 54 Telegram 5/26/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. is wanting progress reports from W.

Folder 55 Letter – typed 5/19/1916 8 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: finding a pilot, B. wants to know what W. thinks of Cooper, other misc.

Folder 56 Letter – handwritten 5/20/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 57 Telegram 5/19/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. sent W. a letter and wishes W. good luck

Folder 58 Telegram 5/14/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: W. unable to get information on pilot and told that demand exceeds supply, thus pay for pilots is high

Folder 59 Telegram 5/17/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: W. is to see Borden in Chicago

Folder 60 Telegram 5/17/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: W. wants to meet B's associate in Chicago

Folder 61 Telegram 5/9/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. wants to know if W. knows of a good pilot available immediately

Folder 62 Letter – typed 5/8/1916 2 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: John Borden visiting B., B. will ask if he can help W. with something (perhaps his resignation?)

Folder 63 Letter – typed 4/22/1916 4 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: upcoming war, B. wants W. to look for a pilot to use in their school, 1st B&W engines should be finished w/in a week, B. complaining about quiet business and social life

Folder 64 Telegram 4/21/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: outlook in Wash C.D. does not look good Folder 65 Telegram 4/21/1916 1st page only - Westerveldt to Boeing re: Progress of W.'s resignation Folder 66 Telegram 4/21/1916 2nd page of telegram in folder 65 - re: war coming soon

Folder 67 Letter – handwritten 4/17/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 68 Letter – handwritten 4/4/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 69 Letter – handwritten No Date Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 70 Letter – handwritten No Date May 2nd? Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 71 Letter – handwritten 4/20/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 72 Letter – handwritten 5/13/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 73 Letter – handwritten 3/29/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 74 Letter – handwritten No Date "West. T Wong letter" written on folder

Folder 75 Telegram 4/21/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: Border will help and will send representative from Chicago to Wash D.C.

Folder 76 Telegram 4/21/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. trying to contact W.

Folder 77 Letter – typed 4/20/1916 Boeing to Com. US Navy Station in Pensacola, FL re: B. is wanting W.'s address

Folder 78 Letter – typed 4/14/1916 Com. US Navy Station in Pensacola, FL to Boeing re: Letter from B. to W. are there, but do not know when W. will arrive

Folder 79 Telegram 4/20/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. wants to know where to send W. a confidential telegram

Folder 80 Letter – typed 3/17/1916 5 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: work progressing well, accident to do downdraft over Queen Ann Hill, B. stayed on East Coast long time, upset with a raid on his house in West, Martin machine not in good shape, business and social life for B. is quiet on West Coast unlike life on East Coast, B. hopes W. will have no problems with his resignation

Folder 81 Letter – handwritten 2/20/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 82 Telegram 3/17/1916 Boeing to Westerveldt re: B. wants W.'s address, things are progressing slowly but favorably

Folder 83 Letter – typed 3/7/1916 2 pages - Boeing to Westerveldt re: radiators, how much heat they produce and at what cost, baby is 12 lbs. And "…a very fine and cheerful specimen…"

Folder 84 Letter – handwritten 7-23-? Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 85 Telegram 12-21-? Boeing to Westerveldt re: where and when to meet, patent, questions regarding working with Heath

Folder 86 Letter - handwritten No Date Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 87 Letter – handwritten No Date Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting

Folder 88 Letter – handwritten No Date Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting - " Monday - West met Douglas at the Martin Co."

Folder 89 Letter – handwritten No Date Westerveldt to Boeing re: can not read handwriting - Tim wrote on folder " Sunday West met Floyd Scott"

Folder 90 Letter – handwritten 5/10/1916 Westerveldt to Boeing

Folder 91 Letter – typed 3/21/1916 B. to Aero Club of America re: Curtiss Marine Flying Trophy Competition and 6 blank entry forms

Folder 92 Letter – typed 3/16/1916 Aero Club of America to Aero Club of the Northwest re: Letter accompanying 6 blank entry forms for Curtis Marine Flying Trophy -- On Display in Founders Exhibit

Folder 93 Entry form Blank entry form for The Curtis Marine Flying Trophy Competition -- On Display in Founders Exhibit

Folder 94 Entry form Blank entry form for The Curtis Marine Flying Trophy Competition Folder 95 Entry form Blank entry form for The Curtis Marine Flying Trophy Competition

Folder 96 Entry form Blank entry form for The Curtis Marine Flying Trophy Competition

Folder 97 Entry form Blank entry form for The Curtis Marine Flying Trophy Competition

Folder 98 Entry form Blank entry form for The Curtis Marine Flying Trophy Competition

Folder 99 Letter – typed 11/23/1916 Boeing to Pan-American Aeronautic Exposition re: contract for space in 1st annual Pan-American Aeronautic Expo

Folder 100 Letter – typed 11/18/1916 2 pages - Pan-American Aeronautic Expo/Aero Club of America to B re: want B. to make an exhibit at the Expo, list of Club officers and committee members

Correspondence Folders 101 to 200

Folder 101 Contract Blank contract for exhibit space at Pan-American Aeronautic Expo

Folder 102 Letter – typed 8/17/1916 Boeing to Howard Coffin, Chairman for Expo organizing committee re: thank for invitation to join organization committee

Folder 103 Letter – typed 8/8/1916 Boeing to Howard Coffin re: B is out of town and will answer letter soon

Folder 104 Letter – typed 8/3/1916 Aero Club of America to Boeing re: Expo, describing what it is, list of officers and various committee members

Folder 105 List with letter in folder 104 list of people on various committees, 5 pages

Folder 106 Letter – typed 12/11/1917 Boeing to Benson Chemistry Dept. UW re: Gorge Clark of Alaska and his theories which B. deems impracticable

Folder 107 Letter – typed 11/13/1917 Boeing to Boeing Co. attn. Ortman re: purchase order for Harris Heavy Oil

Folder 108 Letter – typed 11/10/1917 Boeing to Boeing Co. attn. Ortman re: procedure for checks sent to B.'s office

Folder 109 Letter – typed 11/9/1917 Boeing to Professor McKone, Mechanical Engineering Dept. UW re: tour of students in Boeing factory, B. would like to meet Prof.

Folder 110 Letter – typed 11/7/1917 Professor McKone, UW to Boeing re: wants to take to men (students) on a tour of the Boeing factory

Folder 111 Letter – typed 11/9/1917 Edwin Stevens UW to Boeing re: on behalf or UW Pres. Dr. Suzzallo ask B. to release Mr. Barry (from employment?)

Folder 112 Telegram 11/8/1917 Boeing to Westerveldt re: hope that W. can come out to visit

Folder 113 Telegram 11/2/1917 Boeing to Ortman re: looking for a good factory manager, can he help

Folder 114 Telegram 11/2/1917 Boeing to Knickerbocker re: looking for a good factory manager, can he help

Folder 115 Telegram 11/8/1917 Boeing to Knickerbocker re: looking for a good factory manager, can he help

Folder 116 Telegram 11/8/1917 Boeing to Captain Clark, Army re: Boeing or Gott will meet Clark for his appointment

Folder 117 Telegram 11/8/1917 Clark to Boeing re: want to see B

Folder 118 Letter – typed 11/6/1917 Lambuth to Boeing re: size of B.'s lot at Oxbow

Folder 119 Letter – typed 9/18/1917 Lambuth to Boeing re: lease for land East of Heath Shipyard plant

Folder 120 Telegram 11/2/1917 Brink & Ortman to Foley re: B. unable to answer questions at this time, what is the procedure to follow

Folder 121 Letter – typed 11/2/1917 Boeing Co. to Postmaster re: change of address

Folder 122 Bank statement 10/31/1917 Bank statement from 8-1-1917 to 10-17-1917

Folder 123 Telegram 10/30/1917 To Boeing Co. re: would Boeing Co. like to buy a almost new Curtis Model F flying boat

Folder 124 Letter – typed 10/29/1917 Boeing Co. to Col. Alan re: request for a guard at Boeing plant since working on contracts for the Navy

Folder 125 Letter – typed 10/29/1917 Boeing Co. to Elliot re: shipping order date

Folder 126 Letter – typed 10/24/1917 State Central Committee of WA to Boeing Co. re: B.'s donation to Second Liberty Loan

Folder 127 Newspaper clipping 10/24/1917 "Local Firm Gets War Contract"

Folder 128 Letter – typed 10/22/191 Boeing Co. to ? Re: letter of reference for H.W. Jansen

Folder 129 Telegram 10/6/1917 To Boeing Co. re: inspection of work

Folder 130 Telegram 10/4/1917 Boeing to Navy re: request for Government inspector

Folder 131 Letter – typed 11/1/1917 Boeing Co. to Fogarty re: possibility of no one entering the Boeing plant w/o permission from the Navy since they are working on Navy contracts

Folder 132 Letter – typed 10/8/1917 Boeing Co. to Fogarty re: request for inspection of Seaplanes

Folder 133 Letter – typed 10/5/1917 Boeing Co. to Hudson Motor Co. re: thanks for information

Folder 134 Letter – typed 9/24/1917 2 pages - Boeing to Gott re: price list of items, bids on spare parts

Folder 135 Letter – typed 9/24/1917 copy of previous letter

Folder 136 Letter – typed 9/14/1917 Boeing Co. to Lt. Col. Atkins Navy re: Seaplane contract

Folder 137 Letter – typed 8/31/1917 2 pages - Boeing Co. to Hunsaker (Navy) re: deliveries & prices for Seaplanes

Folder 138 Letter – typed 8/31/1917 Boeing Co. to Hunsaker re: request for Seaplane part drawings

Folder 139 Letter – typed 8/31/1917 Boeing Co. to Hunsaker re: Seaplane Contract

Folder 140 Letter – typed 9/24/1917 Boeing to Bishop re: set up appointment for B. to meet a friend of Bishop's

Folder 141 Letter – typed 9/22/1917 Bishop to Boeing re: Bishop has a friend interested in Seaplanes and wants to meet B.

Folder 142 Letter – typed 9/15/1917 Boeing Co. to Lamont re: Selling of three planes

Folder 143 Letter – typed 9/13/1917 Boeing Co. to Shafer re: Boeing Co. is too busy to do experimental work at this time

Folder 144 Telegram 8/30/1917 Boeing Co. to Smith re: delivery of training Seaplane

Folder 145 Telegram 8/30/1917 Smith to Boeing Co. re: delivery of training Seaplane

Folder 146 Letter – typed 8/22/1917 Boeing to Corporal of the Guard at Lake Union re: authorization of workers working on the Taconite

Folder 147 Letter – typed 8/13/2017 Todd to Gott re: letter accompanying minutes for Boeing Co. Board meeting

Folder 148 Letter – typed 8/1/1917 Boeing Co. to Williams re: address for two Aviation Associations

Folder 149 Letter – typed 9/24/1917 2 pages - Aberdeen Lumber & Shingle Co. to Boeing re: information on manufacturing Spruce for airplane parts

Folder 150 Letter – typed 7/23/1917 Boeing Co. to Livingstone re: visiting plant in Detroit

Folder 151 Letter – typed 7/16/1917 Livingston to Gott: re: when to visit

Folder 152 Letter – typed 7/11/1917 2 pages - Livingston to Gott re: visit, building flying boats

Folder 153 Letter – typed 6/15/1917 ? To Boeing re: cots of building pontoons

Folder 154 Note – handwritten 9/28/1917 Boeing to Staff member re: can not read writing, perhaps it is minutes from the Board meeting mentioned in folder 155

Folder 155 Boeing Board meeting notes 9/28/1917 Land lease agreements

Folder 156 Letter – typed 6/14/1917 Sales manager from Decalomanie Co. to Boeing re: trying to sell B. decals for planes

Folder 157 Letter – typed 8/17/1916 Boeing to Secretary of Aero Club of America re: information sent for Herbert Munter so he can receive his Aviator's Certificate

Folder 158 Letter – typed 2/9/1916 Boeing Co. to Secretary of Aero Club of America re: information sent for Herbert Munter so he can receive his Aviator's Certificate

Folder 159 Letter – typed 2/3/1916 Secretary of Aero Club of America to Boeing Co. re: information sent for Herbert Munter so he can receive his Aviator's Certificate

Folder 160 Bulletin 10/6/1916 4 pages - Bulletin No. 208 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 161 Bulletin 7/20/1916 3 pages - Bulletin No. 179 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 162 Bulletin 6/23/1916 7 pages - Bulletin No. 157 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 163 Bulletin 6/13/1916 4 pages - Bulletin No. 154 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 164 Bulletin 5/12/1916 2 pages - Bulletin No. 136 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 165 Bulletin 3 pages - Bulletin No. 133 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 166 Bulletin 4/18/1916 1 page - Bulletin No. 124 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 167 Bulletin 4/18/1916 1 page - Bulletin No. 125 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 168 Bulletin 4/15/1916 3 pages - Bulletin No. 119 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 169 Bulletin 4/7/1916 6 pages - Bulletin No. 114 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 170 Bulletin 3/31/1916 6 pages - Bulletin No. 106 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 171 Bulletin 3/22/1916 3 pages - Bulletin No. 103 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 172 Bulletin No Date 2 pages - Bulletin No. 97 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 173 Bulletin 3/13/1916 2 pages - Bulletin No. 96 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 174 Bulletin 3/6/1916 2 pages - Bulletin No. 95 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 175 Bulletin 2/28/1916 2 pages - Bulletin No. 94 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 176 Bulletin 2/23/1916 4 pages - Bulletin No. 92 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 177 Bulletin 2/14/1916 2 pages - Bulletin No. 90 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 178 Bulletin 2/15/1916 4 pages - Bulletin No. 91 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 179 Bulletin 1/30/1916 2 pages - Bulletin No. 83 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 180 Bulletin 1/20/1916 2 pages - Bulletin No. 79 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 181 Bulletin 1/10/1916 3 pages - Bulletin No. 78 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 182 Bulletin 1/10/1916 3 pages - Bulletin No. 78 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 183 Bulletin 1/10/1916 3 pages - Bulletin No. 78 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 184 Bulletin 1/10/1916 1 page - Bulletin No. 77 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 185 Bulletin 1/10/1916 3 pages - Bulletin No. 76 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 186 Bulletin No Date 9 pages - Bulletin No. 74 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 187 Bulletin No Date 9 pages - Bulletin No. 74 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 188 Bulletin No Date 3 pages - Bulletin No. 69 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 189 Bulletin No Date 2 pages - Bulletin No. 70 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 190 Bulletin No Date 2 pages - Bulletin No. 72 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 191 Bulletin 12/29/1915 1 page - Bulletin No. 73 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 192 Bulletin 12/30/1915 3 pages - Bulletin No. 73 - "Advance News" from Aero Club of America

Folder 194 Newspaper clipping 2/11/1963 "Flyer who gave Boeing first ride Dies" Louis Paulhan

Folder 195 Letter – typed 3/1/1949 Gordon Williams (of the Boeing Co.) to Mr. Drew re: information on early models to be forwarded to Captain Luftburrow, plus attached memo from Egtvedt

Folder 196 Letter – typed 2/15/1949 Memo from Egtvedt (2 pages, with folder 195) to Gordon Williams re: B&W float Biplane of 1916, Boeing model "C" Float Biplane Folder 197 Letter – typed 8/24/1916 Notice for first meeting for incorporators of Aero Club of the North West (Sic)

Folder 198 Letter – typed 12/27/1916 Boeing to Aero Club of America re: thank for appointing him a member of the Affiliated Clubs Committee for 1916-1917

Folder 199 Letter – typed 8/15/1916 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 200 Letter – typed 8/10/1916 Aero Club of America to Boeing re: list of accomplishments of Aeroclub

Correspondence Folders 201 to 268

Folder 201 Letter – typed 6/21/1916 Aero Club of America to Boeing re: Christening of New York National Guard planes postponed due to mobilization of Militia at the Mexican border

Folder 202 Letter – typed 6/13/1916 Aero Club of America to Boeing re: invite to Christening of three planes in New York National Guard

Folder 203 Letter – typed 5/26/1916 Aero Club of America to Boeing re: sending to Boeing a copy of special edition of New York World (newspaper) - first paper to be delivered by air to Washington DC

Folder 204 Letter – typed 3/24/1916 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 205 Letter – typed 3/15/1916 Copy of letter to President of Aero Club to Boeing re: mobilization for Mexican campaign

Folder 206 Letter – typed 3/15/1916 Copy of letter to President of Aero Club to Boeing re: mobilization for Mexican campaign

Folder 207 Letter – typed 3/15/1916 Original of letter to President of Aero Club to Boeing re: mobilization for Mexican campaign

Folder 208 Telegram 1/31/1916 4 pages - President of Aero Club to Boeing re: training aviators, US is unprepared for war

Folder 209 Letter – typed 1/27/1916 President of Aero Club to Boeing re: Emerson McMillian to add 11% to all funds up to 500,000 collected for development of aviation corps in militia

Folder 210 Telegram 1/29/1916 Copy - Gott to Boeing re: Emerson McMillian offer for funding

Folder 211 Telegram 1/29/1916 Gott to President of Aero Club re: letter received and will be given to Boeing on his return

Folder 212 Telegram 1/21/1916 original from folder 210

Folder 213 Letter – typed 1/11/1916 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 214 Letter – typed 1/4/1916 Copy - President of Aero Club to Boeing re: asking for contributions

Folder 215 Letter – typed 1/6/1916 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 216 Letter – typed 12/31/1915 Aero Club to Boeing re: Boeing elected non-resident member of club

Folder 217 Letter – typed 12/29/1915 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 218 Letter – typed 12/23/1915 Aero Club to Boeing re: 10th annual Banquets of Club

Folder 219 Letter – typed 12/27/1915 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 220 Letter – typed 12/21/1915 American Aero Club (Henry Woodhouse) to Boeing re: thank you for photo , would like to see Boeing next time he is in NY

Folder 221 Letter – typed 12/21/1915 Copy - Henry Woodhouse to Gardner re: list of people to send "Flying" magazine to

Folder 222 Letter – typed 12/24/1915 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 223 Letter – typed 12/16/1915 Henry Woodhouse to Boeing re: Boeing elected to be non-resident member of Aero Club

Folder 224 Letter – typed 12/24/1915 Boeing Co. to Pres. of Aero Club re: received letter and will give to Boeing on his return

Folder 225 Letter – typed 12/16/1915 Aero Club to Westerveldt re: funds available for aeroplane companies from Government for militia needing airplanes

Folder 226 Letter – typed Aero Club to Westerveldt re: funds available for aeroplane companies from Government for militia needing airplanes

Folder 227 Letter – typed Aero Club to Westerveldt re: funds available for aeroplane companies from Government for militia needing airplanes

Folder 228 List 7/9/1932 Numerical list of Boeing Models - Issue #20

Folder 229 Report 9/22/1942 Engineering report - "Planning for the future"

Folder 229 Letter – typed 9/23/1942 W.E. Boeing to P.G. Johnson - re: submittal of engineering report

Folder 229 Meeting minutes 9/4/1942 Meeting minutes for Boeing Engineering Technical Committee

Folder 229 Meeting minutes 9/18/1942 Meeting minutes for Boeing Engineering Technical Committee

Folder 229 Meeting minutes 8/28/1942 Meeting minutes for Boeing Engineering Technical Committee

Folder 230 Notes 6/6/1963 History of Boeing Co. - from Boeing News Bureau

Folder 231 Notes 5/24/1963 The Boeing Co. - Historical Highlights

Folder 232 Chart mid 1960's "Parade of Progress" - chart with images (line drawings) of all of Boeing's planes and helicopters in the year that they were designed

Folder 233 Postcard August 30 - ? The Praegers to Boeing - from Bangkok, list of address to send mail to, maybe during the war?????

Folder 233 Photocopy August 30 -? Photocopy of # 239 listed above

Folder 234 List 6/10/1963 list of films available for viewing and accompanying letter from the Film Editor at the Boeing Co. News Bureau

Folder 235 Notes 5/24/1963 "Boeing in Brief" - brief descriptions of Boeing aircraft, from Boeing News Bureau

Folder 236 Letter – typed 1/12/1949 Drew (Boeing Asst.?) to Captain William G. Lufburrow Jr. - re: Boeing is interested in correspondence between Lufburrow and people in New Zealand regarding B&W planes that were used in New Zealand for Air Mail service

Folder 236 Letter – typed 11/3/1948 Drew to Capt. Lufburrow - re: Boeing received his letter and will reply when able

Folder 237 Letter – typed 11/18/1948 Drew to Harold Mansfield - re: request for information on B&W and other planes on behalf of Lufburrow who is writing a book an early aviation

Folder 237 Letter – typed 2/4/1949 Gordon Williams (News Bureau at Boeing Co.) to D.R. Drew - re: sent request for information on to others at Boeing "Old Timers" who may know answers

Folder 237 Letter – typed 1/12/1949 Drew to Mansfield - re: wanting to know if Mansfield received list of questions from Lufburrow

Folder 238 List 6/10/1963 List of films available for viewing and accompanying letter from the Film Editor at the Boeing Co. News Bureau

Folder 239 Letter – typed 6/11/1963 Al Hill (Community Relations Representative at Boeing Co.) to Drew - re: sending list of films and Company History to him since Drew is keeping a file on the company

Folder 240 Letter – typed 1/10/1949 Capt. Lufburrow to Boeing - re: Lufburrow's correspondence with Leo Walsh of New Zealand regarding B&W first air mail flights in New Zealand

Folder 241 Letter – typed 3/1/1949 Capt. Lufburrow to Drew - re: sending copies of letters from Leo Walsh and others in New Zealand regarding B&W planes and air mail flights

Folder 241 Letter – typed 1/24/1949 Leo Walsh to Capt. Lufburrow - re: will answer Lufburropw's questions and is sending some information and articles now, will send more later once he has obtained it

Folder 241 Letter – typed 8/3/1948 Copy - New Zealand Civil Air Dept. (E.A. Gibson) to Capt. Lufburrow - re: details about two B&W 's purchased in 1919 by the New Zealand Flying School

Folder 241 Letter – typed 9/28/1948 Copy - P.N. Cryer (Director General New Zealand Post Office) to Capt. Lufburrow - re: use of B&W planes for air mail flights by New Zealand Post Office, and information on the specific flights

Folder 242 Program 9/13/1927 Reception for Lindbergh in Seattle

Folder 243 Magazine article May, 1942 Article ripped out of a magazine - U.S. Air Services - "Mr. Boeing rejoins Boeing" - Bill Boeing acting as a consultant during the WWII years

Folder 244 Brochure 1947 Brochure about the history of Victoria, BC Canada, the first 60 years, celebrated in 1947. Photo on pg. 16 of Boeing holding the mail bag after the first international air mail flight from Seattle to Vancouver on March 3, 1919

Folder 245 Newspaper clipping 6/5/1947 Seattle P.I. - "A daring young man" by Emmet Watson - re: Captain Freeman who did dealings with Boeing

Folder 246 Newspaper clipping 7/29/1942 Wall Street Journal - "What's the matter with this country" by Raymond Moles - suggestions on how governmental leaders can teach the public the virtue of sacrifice

Folder 247 Newspaper clipping 6/25/1973 Seattle Times - "Seattle's Historical Markers" - "Boeing built a better plane" by David Suffig re: Boeing's float plane Folder 247 Newspaper clipping No Date photocopy of # 260 listed above

Folder 248 Newspaper clipping 12/16/1966 Seattle P.I. - Boeing enshrined in National Aviation Hall of Fame.

Folder 248 List 12/15/1966 List of nominees for National Aviation Hall of Fame

Folder 248 Letter – typed 11/18/1966 President of National Aviation Hall of Fame to Boeing - re: invitation to event, list of events and times….

Folder 248 Letter – typed 11/9/1966 Mrs. Boeing to President of National Aviation Hall of Fame - re: thank you for invitation to attend, but her health prevents travel at this time

Folder 248 Letter – typed 11/9/1966 Copy of # 265 listed above

Folder 248 Letter – typed 10/12/1966 Drew to President of National Aviation Hall of Fame - re: thank you for invitation to Mrs. Boeing

Folder 248 Letter – typed 9/30/1966 Invitation for Mrs. Boeing to attend, from National Aviation Hall of Fame

Folder 249 Notes No Date on History of Boeing with corrections by Bill Jr.

Folder 250 Newspaper clipping November & December 1927 3 articles photocopied and glued to one piece of paper 1. "Boeing takes care of neediest case in Seattle" 2. Airliner brings 7 passengers and 2 pilots to Seattle 3. Halt's airline mail brought to Seattle by auto

Folder 251 Newspaper clipping 7/24/1927 Enlarged photocopy of article from Seattle Daily Times - "Seattle Industry that Assists men to fly" - all about Boeing Co.

Folder 252 Scan No Date $30 (A bond? IOU? Check?) That Boeing will pay to bank on May 1929

Folder 253 Notes photocopied notes from NASAM Archives on Thorp Hiscock

Folder 253 Notes photocopied notes on Thorp Hiscock

Folder 254 Article page photocopied from a book on Monomail and other Boeing planes

Folder 255 Newspaper clipping 7-3-192? Comic of a Boeing airplane as a bird feeding baby birds that are the airline industry - from Seattle Daily Times

Folder 256 Cartoon No Date Comic / caricature of Boeing in a plane

Folder 257 Newspaper clipping 3/9/1919 The Seattle Sunday Times - article and photo on air mail service, photo of Boeing holding mail bag standing in front of float plane

Folder 258 Newspaper clipping 7/31/1928 San Francisco Chronicle - article on Boeing Field being named after Boeing

Folder 259 Newspaper clipping 2/18/1919 The Seattle Daily Times - photo Seattle to Vancouver Flight - Boeing plane damaged due to bad weather, forced to land at Anacortes

Folder 260 Newspaper clipping 9/18/1934 Photocopy and enlargement of an article printed in Seattle Times in 1976 - History of Seattle - photo of Boeing holding mail bag in front of plane

Folder 261 Newspaper clipping 6/16/1916 Photocopy and enlargement of article "Sportsman flies his new hydroaeroplane" photo of Boeing

Folder 262 Envelope envelope

Folder 262 Greeting card Card with photo of earth with man on top, printed letter/story on back perhaps from a Christmas card, signed "The Finleys"

Folder 262 Greeting card Card with photo of signed globe (now lost according to Boeing Jr.) , written letter on card to Boeing from (? - can not read signature) - re: thanks for the photo and globe

Folder 263 Speech Typewritten speech given by Finley for Lindbergh printed on newsprint Addresses a Govenor Smith, Col Lindbergh speech possibly given in New York in late 1920's

Folder 264 Scrap Address for Alex Hixon, written on scrap of paper that was a ticket

Folder 265 Card Nookey ration card

Folder 266 Card Boeing New York Jockey Club membership card, with colors on back

Folder 266 Ticket - San Francisco to Chicago on Boeing Air Transport, US Air Mail, Transcontinental Passenger Service

Folder 266 3-d object Wallet with "William Boeing" embossed on front in gold

Folder 266 Ticket Guest pass for International Aircraft Exposition in St. Louis Missouri --- In leather wallet

Folder 266 Ticket Readmission ticket for International Aircraft Exposition in St. Louis Missouri

Folder 266 display Paper instruction card for readmission for International Aircraft Exposition in St. Louis Missouri In leather wallet

Folder 267 Newspaper section No Date Front section of newspaper "Vancouver Daily Star" - headline of article "City sends first mail to Seattle by aeroplane" with photo of mail bag being handed to Boeing

Folder 3-d object Leather writing tablet with pencil

Folder Large Certificate 1966 Boeing certificate for Lieutenant in Navy

Folder 268 Typed Letter accompanying certificate mentioned above

Return to Table of Contents »


 Library William E Boeing Sr Library Collection 20th Century   12.0 Linear feet , consisting of 263 Books from William E. Boeing Sr personal library

William E Boeing Sr. Library Access

Access to the William E Boeing Sr. Library materials is by prior appointment only.

William E Boeing Sr Library

--. Pioneering in Aeronautics. Washington, D.C.: Daniel Guggenheim Medal Board, 1952.

--. Aero Club of America. New York: Vreeland Advertising Press, 1916.

--. The Aircraft Industry: Study of Underlying Trends [Curtis Research Report]. Philadelphia: Curtis Publishing Co., 1930.

--. The Blue Book of Aviation. [not given]: Hoagland Co., 1930.

--. Dedication of the Wright Brothers’ Home and Shop in Greenwich Village. New York: Edison Institute, 1938.

--. Financial Handbook of the American Aviation Industry. New York: Commercial National Bank and Trust Company, 1929.

--. Il Volatare Almanacco per Vanno. Bologna: Piesso di Nobile e Comp., 1826.

--. Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft, 1955-1956. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1956.

--. Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft, 1957-1958. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1958.

--. Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft. New York, 1956.

--. The Material Achievements of Great Britain and Her Allies From 1799 to 1815. London: Js. Jenkins, 1814.

--. The Nation’s Business. (December, 1928). Signed by author of the article.

--. The P&W Story. New York: Pratt and Whitney, 1950.

Aero Club of America. Navigating the Air. New York: Doubleday, Page and Co., 1907.

Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America . Aviation Year Book 1922. (3) New York: Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America, 1922.

Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America . Aviation Year Book 1923. New York: Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America, 1923.

Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America . Aviation Year Book 1927. (2) New York: Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America, 1927.

Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America . Aviation Year Book 1928. (3) New York: Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America, 1928.

Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America . The Aircraft Yearbook for 1929. New York: Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America, 1929.

Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America. The Aircraft Yearbook for 1930. (2) New York: Van Nostrand, 1930.

Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America. The Aircraft Yearbook for 1931. (2) New York: Van Norstrand and Company, 1931.

Aircraft Manufacturers’ Association. Aviation Year Book 1920. (2) Garden City, New York: Doubleday, Page and Co., 1920.

Allen, Lewis. Airship Almanac. London: John Lane Company, 1909.

Amundsen, Roald et al. Our Polar Flight. New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1925. Signed by author.

Andrews, S.T.G. et al. The Theory and Practice of Aeroplane Design. New York: E.P. Dutton and Company, 1920.

Anon. We Came in Peace. San Rafael, CA: 1969.

Anon. We Came in Peace. San Rafael, California, 1969.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Night Flight. New York: Century Company, 1932.

Arban, F. Cenni Sulla Navigazione Aerea. Milan: C. Rivolta, 1818.

Arban, Francesco. Cenni Sulla Navigazione Aerea Dell’epoca Della Sua Scoperta Sina al Mostri Giiorni, etc. Milano, 1845.

Arban, Francesco. Cennie Suklka Navigaziioni Aera Dell’epoca Dell Sua Scoperta Sino al Nostri Giorni, etc. Milano: C. Rivolta, 1845.

Arnold, Henry H. Airmen and Aircraft: An Introduction to Aeronautics. New York: Ronald Press Co., 1926.

“Avion.” Aeroplanes and Aero Engines. London: G. Arthur Preston, 1918.

Bacon, Gertrude. How Men Fly. London: Cassell and Company, Ltd., 1911.

Bacon, Gertrude. The Record of an Aeronaut. London: John Long, 1907.

Bacon, John M. By Land and Sky. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1901.

Bacon, John M. The Dominion of the Air. Philadelphia: David McKay, 1903.

Bamwell, F.S. and W.H. Sayers. Aeroplane Design and a Simple Explanation of Inherent Stability. London: Robert M. McBridge and Co., 1917.

Barber, H. The Aeroplane Speaks. London: Robert M. McBride, 1927.

Bean, Barbara. Of Magic Sails: A Photographic History of Air Travel, 1926-1976. (2) Chicago: United Airlines, 1975.

Bean, Barbara. Of Magic Sails: A Photographic History of Air Travel, 1926-1976. Chicago, 1975.

Benn, Wedgewood (Captain). In the Side Shows. London: Charles Griffin and Company, 1918. Berget, Alphonse. Conquest of the Air. London: William Heinemann, 1909.

Berry, W.H. Aircraft in War and Commerce. (2) New York: George H. Doran Company, 1918.

Bingham, Hiram. An Explorer in the Air Service. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1920.

Black, Archibald. Civil Airports and Airways. [not given]: Simmons-Boardman Publishing Co., 1929. Signed by author.

Black, Archibald. Transport Aviation. London: Simmons-Boardman Publishing Co., 1926.

Blake, Eli W. Original Solutions of Several Problems in Aerodynamics. London: Morehouse and Taylor, 1882.

Blake, W.T. (Major). Flying Around the World. London: Heath Cranton, 1923.

Booth, Harris. Aeroplane Performance Calculations. [?] Series. New York: E.P. Dutton and Co., 1921.

Bott, Alan. Cavalry of the Clouds. New York: Doubleday Pages and Co., 1918.

Bragdon, Claude. A Primer of Higher Space. London: The Manas Press, 1913.

Brewer, Robert W.A. The Art of Aviation. London: Crosby Lockwood and Son, 1910.

Bridgeman, William and Hazard Jacquelin. The Lonely Sky. Edgeware Cliffs, NJ: Henry Holt and Co., 1955.

Bright, Charles. Telegraphy, Aeronautics and War. London: Constable and Company, 1917.

Burge, C.L. (Squadron Leader), ed. The Air Annual of the British Empire, 1931-32 (Volume III). London: Gale and Polden, Ltd., 1931.

Burls, G.A. Aero Engine: Theory of Internal Combustion Engine. London: Charles Griffin and Company, 1918.

Burls, G.A. Aero Engines: With a General Introductory Account of the Theory of the Internal Combustion Engine. 4th Edition, London, 1918.

Byrd, Richard E. Little America. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1930. Limited edition. Signed by author.

Byrd, Richard E. Skyward. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1928. Limited edition. Signed by author.

Caiden, Martin. The Boeing 707. New York: Ballantine Books, 1959.

Carmina, Benjamin M. Aerostatics or a History of Balloon Aviation. London: Macmillan, 1919.

Carpenter, Ford A. The Aviator and the Weather Bureau. San Diego, 1917.

Carpenter, Ford A. The Aviator and the Weather Bureau. San Diego: San Diego Chamber of Commerce, 1917.

Caulkins, Daniel. Aerial Navigation: The Best Method. London: Blade Printing and Paper Co., 1895.

Caunter, C.F. Light Aero Engines. London: Sir Isaac Pitman and Sons, 1930.

Celiere, Paul. The Startling Exploits of Dr. J.B. Quies. New York: Harper and Bros, 1887.

Chamberlain, Clarence D. Record Flights. (4) New York: Dorrance and Co., 1928. Three boxes, etc.

Chatley, Herbert. A Text-book of Aeronautical Engineering: The Problem of Flight. London, 1921.

Chichester, Francis G. Seaplane Solo. New York: Harcourt Brace and Company, 1934.

Cleveland, Reginald M. American Fledges its Wings: The Daniel Guggenheim Fund. New York: Pitman Publishing, 1942.

Cleveland, Reginald M. American Fledges Wings: The History of the Donald Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics. New York, 1942.

Clifford, George Reid. My Experiences as an Aviator in the World War. London: Richard D. Badger, 1928.

Cobham, Alan (Sir). Twenty Thousand Miles in a Flying Boat: My Flight Round Africa. Philadelphia: David McKay Company, 1930.

Collins, A. Frederick. How to Fly. New York: How to Fly, 1919.

Collins, Frederick. Aviation and All About Us. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1929.

Collison, Thomas. Flying Fortress. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1943.

Collison, Thomas. Flying Fortress: The Story of the Boeing Bomber. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1944. Signed by author.

Collison, Thomas. The Superfortress is Born. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1945. Inscribed by author.

Collison, Thomas. The Winged World: An Anthology of Aviation Fiction. New York: Coward-McCann, 1943. Signed by author.

Commander, Kingsmill. Vikings of the Stars. London: Harold Vinal Ltd., 1928.

Cortright, Edgar M. Exploring Space With a Camera. Washington, D.C., 1968.

Cortright, Edgar M. Exploring Space With a Camera. Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1968.

Coxwell, Henry. My Life and Balloon Experiences. London: W.H.Allen and Co., 1889.

D’Orcy, Ladislas. D’Orcy’s Airship Manual. New York: The Century Company, 1917.

Daniel Guggenheim Fund. Report of the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics. New York: Daniel Guggenheim Fund, 1929.

Daniel Guggenheim Fund. Final Report of the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics, 1929. [not given]: Daniel Guggenheim Fund, 1930.

David, Evan John. Aircraft: Its Development in War and Peace and Its Commercial Future. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1919.

Davis, W. Jefferson. The World’s Wings. London: Simmons-Boardman Publishing Co., 1927.

De Grilleau, B. Les Aerostats Dirigeables. Paris: E. Dentu, 1884.

De Guiche, A. de Gramont. The Aviator’s Pocket Dictionary and Table-Book. London: Brentano’s, 1918.

De Lapouyade, Meaudre. Les Premiers Aeronautics Bordelaise 1783-1799. Bordeaux: G. Gounnouyihou, 1910.

De Sibour, Violette. Flying Gypsies. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1930. Postcards laid in.

Dommett, W.E. Aeroplanes and Airships. London: Whittaker and Co., 1915.

Donald Guggenheim Fund. Report of the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics. New York, 1929.

Drew, George A. (Lieutenant-Colonel). Canada’s Fighting Airmen. Toronto: Maclean Publishing Company, 1930.

Duchene, Commandant. Flight Without Formula. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1914.

Ellis, Frank H. Canada’s Flying Heritage. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1954.

Ellsworth, Lincoln. Air Pioneering in the Arctic. New York: National Americana Society, 1929.

Fage, A. The Aeroplane: A Concise Scientific Study. London: Charles Griffin and Company, 1918.

Financial Handbook of the American Aviation Industry. New York, 1929.

Fokker, Anthony H.G. et al. Flying Dutchman. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1931.

Gann, Ernest K. The High and Mighty. New York, 1953.

Gann, Ernest K. The High and the Mighty. New York, 1929.

Gill, N.J. (Captain). The Flyer’s Guide. New York: E.P. Dutton and Co., 1917.

Giudici, David. The Tragedy of the Italia. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1929.

Glaisher, Games et al. Travels in the Air. London: Richard Bentley, 1871.

Glassman, Don. Jump: Tales of the Caterpillar Club. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1930.

Gould, Bruce. Sky Larking: The Romantic Adventure of Flying. New York: Horace Liveright, 1929.

Grahme-White, Claude et al. The Aeroplane: Past, Present, and Future. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott and Co., 1911.

Gunston, Bill, ed. Encyclopedia of World Air Power. New York: Crescent Books, 1986.

Gunston, Bill, editor. Encyclopedia of World Air Power. New York: Crescent Books, 1986.

Hall, Bert and John H. Niles. One Man’s War: The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille. New York: Henry Holt, 1929.

Hall, Bert and John J. Niles. One Man’s War: The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille. New York, 1929.

Hall, James Norman. High Adventure: A Narrative of Fighting in France. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1918.

Hall, Norman S. The Balloon Buster: Frank Luke of Arizona. Garden City: Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1928.

Hamel, Gustav and C. Turr. Flying: Some Practical Experiences. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1914.

Harris, Sherwood. The First to Fly: Aviation’s Pioneer Days. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1970.

Hawks, Frank. Speed. New York: Brewer, Warren and Putnam, 1931. Signed by author.

Hearne, R.P. Aerial Warfare. London: John Lane Company, 1909.

Heinel, Ernst. Stormy Life: Memoirs of a Pioneer of the Air Age. New York: E.P. Dutton and Company, 1956.

Henrion, Francesco. Fondamenti Teorico—Pratico dell’Arte Aeronautica, etc. Firenze: Pietru Alligreni, 1789.

Henrion, Francesco. Fondamenti Toerico-Practici dell’Arte Aeronautica, etc. Firenze, 1789.

Hirsch, Robert Reynolds. An Aviator’s Fieldbook: Being the Field Reports of Oswald Boelcke. London: National Military Publishing Co., 1917. Translated from the German.

Hiscox, Gardner D. Horseless Vehicles. [n/a]: Norman W. Henley and Co., 1900.

Hodgson, J.E. The History of Aeronautics in Great Britain From the Earliest Times to the Latter Half of the Nineteenth Century. London, 1924.

Hodgson, J.E. The History of Aeronautics in Great Britain, etc. London: Oxford University Press, 1924.

Holt, Thomas G. Aerial Transport. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1920.

Hubbard, T. O’B et al. The Aeroplane: An Elementary Textbook. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott and Co., 1911.

Hubler, Richard G. Big Eight: Biography of an Airplane. New York: Duell, Sloane and Pearce, 1960.

Ingells, Douglas J. 747: The Story of the Boeing Super Jet. (2) New York: Aero Publishers, 1970. One copy signed by author.

Ingells, Douglas J. 747: Story of the Boeing Super-jet. California, 1970.

Jackman, W.J. et al. Flying Machines, Construction and Operation. London: Charles C. Thompson Co., 1910.

Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft, 1940. London, 1940.

Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft, 1940. London: Samson Low Marston and Company, 1940.

Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft, 1955-1956. New York, 1956.

Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft, 1957-1957. New York, 1958.

Johnson, Robert E. Airway One. Chicago: United Airlines, 1974. Signed by author.

Juan de la Cierva et al. Wings of Tomorrow: The Story of the Autogiro. London: Brewer, Warren and Putnam, 1931.

Judge, Arthur W. Automobile and Aircraft Engines. 2nd edition. London: Isaac Pitman and Sons, 1931.

Judge, Arthur W. Automobile and Aircraft Engines. London, 1918.

Judge, Arthur W. Automobile and Aircraft Engines. London, 1918.

Judge, Arthur W. The Design of Aeroplanes. London: Whittaker and Co., 1916.

Judge, Arthur W. The Properties of Aerofoils and Aerodynamic Bodies. London: Whittaker and Co., 1917.

Kaempffert, Waldemar. The New Art of Flying. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1911.

Keith, Ronald A. Bush Pilot with a Brief Case. New York: Doubleday and Company, 1972.

Kelly, Charles J., Jr. The Sky’s the Limit. New York: Coward-McCann, 1963.

Kennedy, Rankin. Flying Machines: Practice and Design, etc. London: Technical Publishing Company, 1909.

Kennedy, Rankin. Flying Machines’ Practice and Design: Their Principles, Construction and Working. London, 1909.

Kennedy, Thomas Hart. The Economics of Air Transportation. New York: Macmillan Company, 1924. Signed by author.

Keyhoe, Donald E. Flying with Lindbergh. New York: G.P. Putnam, 1928.

Klass, Joe. Amelia Earhart Lives: A Trip Through Intrigue to Find America’s First Lady of Mystery. (2) New York, 1966. Holographic letter laid in.

Knappen, Theodore Macfarland. Wings of War. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1920. Koehl, Herman (Captain). The Three Musketeers of the Air. (2) New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1928.

Lanchester, F.W. Aerodynamics. London: Archibald Constable and Co., 1906.

Lanchester, F.W. Aircraft in Warfare: Dawn of the Fourth Arm. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1916.

Langeweiche, Wolfgang. Stick and Rudder. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1944.

Leasor, James. The Millionth Chance: The Story of R-101. New York: Reynal and Company, 1957.

Lindberg, Charles A. We. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1927. Limited edition. Signed by author.

Lindbergh, Anne Morrow. Hour of Gold, Hour of Lead. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973.

Lindbergh, Anne Morrow. North to the Orient. New York: Harcourt Brace and Company, 1935. Owner’s signature.

Lindbergh, Charles A. The Spirit of St. Louis. (2) New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1953. One copy inscribed by author.

Lobeck, A.K. Airways of America. United Airlines Guidebook No. 1. New York: The Geographical Press, 1933.

Loening, Grover C. Military Aeroplanes: An Explanatory Consideration, etc. (2) San Diego: Signal Corps Aviation School, 1915. (Fourth Edition, 1917)

Loening, Grover C. Military Aeroplanes: An Explanatory Consideration, etc. San Diego: Signap Corps Aviation School, 1915.

Loening, Grover. Our Wings Grow Faster. Garden City: Doubleday Doran and Company, 1935.

Lombard, Lawrence. Flight to Alaska – 1930, etc. Boston, 1966.

Lundborg, Einar. The Arctic Rescue: How Nobile Was Saved. (2) New York: Viking Press, 1929. Signed by author.

Maitland, Lester J. (Lieutenant). Knights of the Air. (2) Garden City: Doubleday, Doran, 1929. Signed by author.

Mansfield, Harold. Billion Dollar Battle: The Story Behind the “Impossible” 727 Project. Philadelphia: David McKay Company, 1965. Signed by author.

Mansfield, Harold. Vision, the Story of Boeing: A Saga of the Sky and the New Horizons of Space. New York: Popular Library, 1966.

Mansfield, Harold. Vision, the Story of Boeing: A Saga of the Sky and the New Horizons of Space. New York: Duell Sloan Pearce, 1966. Inscribed by author.

Mansfield, Harold. Vision: A Saga of the Sky. New York: Duell, Sloane and Pearce, 1956.

Marion, F. Wonderful Balloon Ascents or Conquest of the Skies. New York: Charles Scribner & Co., 1870.

Marquess of Douglas et al. The Pilot’s Book of Everest. Garden City: Doubleday, Doran and Company, 1936.

Masters, Edgar Lee. Toward the Gulf. New York: MacMillan, 1918.

Mathews, R. Borlase. The Aviation Pocket-Book for 1913. London: Crosby-Lockwood and Sons, 1913.

Mazzacurali, Luigi. Di Un Nuovo Apparecchio Chimico Per Caricare Gli Aerobat. Bologna: Governativa della Volpe al Sassi, 1959.

McAdie, Alexander. The Principle of Aerography. London: George G. Harrap and Co., Ltd., 1917.

McArthur, Warren. Four Miles South of Kitty Hawk. [not given]: Warren McArthur Corporation, 1943.

McCall, Robert and Isaac Asimov. Our World in Space. Greenwich, CT: 1974.

McMinnies, W.G. Practical Flying. New York: George H. Doran Co., 1918. Inscribed by author.

McMinnies, W.G. (Flight Commander). Practical Flying. New York: George H. Doran, 1918.

Mears, John Henry. Racing the Moon. London: Rae D. Henry Co., Inc, 1928.

Middleton, Edgar. Glorious Exploits of the Air. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1918

Miller, Fracis Trevalyan. Lindbergh: His Story in Pictures. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1929.

Miller, Harold Blaine (Lieutenant). Navy Wings. New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1937.

Mitchell, William (Brigadier General). Our Air Force: The Keystone of National Defense. New York: E.P. Dutton and Co., 1921.

Moore, Byron. The First Five Million Miles. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1955.

Morris, Lloyd and Kendall Smith. Ceiling Unlimited: The Story of American Aviation from Kitty Hawk. New York: Macmillan Company, 1953.

Murchie, Guy. Song of the Sky. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1954.

Murphy, Charles J.V. Parachute. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1930.

Murray, George. Aerial Locomotion. London: C. Tinling and Co., 1896.

Nordhoff, Charles and James Hall. Falcons of France. Boston: Little Brown and Co., 1929.

O’Brien, Pat. Outwitting the Hun. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1928.

O’Neill, Ralph. A Dream of Eagles. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1973.

Orlandi, Francesco. Descrizione della Macchina Aerobatica. Breschia, 1831.

Orlando, Francesco. Descrizione della Macchina Aerobatica. Brescia: Tipographia Cristiani, 1831.

Ovington, Adelaide. An Aviator’s Wife. New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1920.

Ovitt, S.W. (1st Lieutenant). The Balloon Section of the American Expeditionary Forces. (not given): S.W. Ovitt, 1919.

Page, Victor W. (Lieutenant). Glossary of Aviation Terms. (2) London: Crosby Lockwood and Son, 1918. English and French texts.

Patrick, Mason M. The United States in the Air. (2) New York: Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1928.

Pollard, Harold. Aero Engines, Magnetos and Carburetors. London: Macmillan Co., 1918.

Proceedings of the Conference on Aerial Navigation 1893. [publisher not shown], 1893.

Proceedings of the Conference on Aerial Navigation 1894. New York: American Engineer and Railway Journal, 1894.

Raymond, Arthur E. Who? Me? Autobiography of Arthur E. Raymond. [not given]: Arthur E. Raymond, 1974.

Reeves, Earl. Aviation’s Place in Tomorrow’s Business. New York: B.C. Forbes Publishing Co., 1930.

Rickenbacker, Edward V. Fighting the Flying Circus. New York: Frederick A. Stokes, 1919. Signed by author.

Rickenbacker, Edward V. Rickenbacker: An Autobiography. Edgeware Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1967. Signed by author.

Roberts, E.M. (Lieutenant). A Flying Fighter: An American Above the Lines in France. (2) New York: Harper and Brothers, 1918.

Rolt-Wheeler, Francis. The Boy With the U.S. Aviators. Boston: Lothrop, Lee and Shepard, 1929.

Rosendal, C.E. (Lieutenant-Commander). Up Ship! New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1931.

Rosher, Harold. With the Flying Squadron. London: Macmillion, 1916.

Rotch, A. Lawrence. New Conquest of the Air, or the Advent of Aerial Navigation. London: Moffat, Yard and Co., 1918.

Roy, Jules. The Navigator. New York, 1955.

Sanson, Pere et Gils. Explication du Systeme de Navigation Aerienne. Paris, 1848.

Santos-Dumont, A. My Air-ships. New York: Century Company, 1904.

Sassoon, Philip (Sir). The Third Route. Garden City: Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1929.

Shute, Nevil. Slide Rule: The Autobiography of an Engineer. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1954.

Sircos, A. and Th. Pallier. Histoire des Ballons et des Ascensions Celebres Avec Une Preface de Nadar. Paris: F. Roy, 1876.

Smith, Henry Ladd. A History of Airways. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1942. Signed by author.

Smith, Ross. 14,000 Miles Through the Air. London: MacMillan and Co., 1922.

Spraight, J.M. Aircraft and Commerce in War. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1926.

Stewart, Lady Margaret. The Winged Life. Philadelphia: David Mackay, 1946.

Stimson, Thomas Douglas. “Log of the Waco,” in the Seattle Town Crier 1928. Signed by author.

Sweetser, Arthur (Captain). Opportunities in Aviation. (2) New York: Harper and Brothers, 1920.

Taylor, Frank J. High Horizons: Daredevil Flying Postmen to Modern Magic Carpet—The United Airlines Story. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1951. Presentation slip.

Taylor, Frank J. “’Pat’ Patterson.” The Sportsman Pilot, Vol. 3, no. 2 (February 1930). Lane Magazine and Book Company, 1967.

Taylor, P.G. Pacific Flight: The Story of the Lady Southern Cross. London: Angus and Robertson Limited, 1935.

Tennant, J.E. In the Clouds Above Baghdad. London: Cecil Palmer, 1920.

Thomas, Lowell. European Skyways. Boston: Houghton Mifflin and Co., 1927.

Thomson, G.P. Applied Aerodynamics. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1922.

Thomson, Jay Earle. Aviation Stories. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1929. Three copies; two limited editions and two signed by author.

Thruelson, Richard. The Story of Transoceanic Flight. Edgecliff Heights, New Jersey: Henry Holt and Co., 1952.

Tifernate, Giuseppe Donini. Saggio Aereonautica. Firenze: Giuseppe de Giovagchino Pagani, 1819.

Timbs, John. Stories of Inventors and Discoverers. New York: Harper’s and Brothers, 1960.

Tomlinson, D.W. The Sky’s the Limit. London: MacRae Smith Co., 1930. Signed by author.

Turner, Charles C. Aerial Navigation of Today: A Popular Account of the Evolution. London: Seeley and Co., 1910.

Turner, Charles C. (1st Lieutenant). The Marvels of Aviation. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1917.

Turner, Charles. Aerial Navigation of Today. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1910.

Vaeth, J. Gordon. Graf Zeppelin: The Adventure of an Aerial Globetrotter. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1958.

Villiers, Alan. The Set of the Sails. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1949.

Vissering, Harry. Zeppelin: The Story of a Great Achievement. Chicago, 1922.

Von Dewitz, Rholf (Baron). War’s New Weapons. New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1915.

Walken, S.L. Soaring Flight and the Stability of Aeroplanes (Aeroplanes in Gusts). London: E. and F.N. Spon, 1913.

Wead, Frank. Wings for Men. New York: The Century Company, 1931.

Wells, H.G. The War in the Air and Particularly how Mr. Bert Smallways Fared While it Lasted. New York: MacMillan, 1908.

Wells, Linton. Around the World in Twenty-eight Days. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1926. Slip case.

Westerfelt, G.C. (Commander). The Triumph of the NC’s. New York: Doubleday Page and Co., 1920.

Wheat, George Seay. Municipal Landing Fields and Air Ports. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1920.

Widmer, Emil J. Military Observation Balloons. London: G. Arthur Preston, 1918.

Wiley, Frank W. Montana and the Sky. Helena, MT: Montana Aeronautics Commission, 1968.

Wiley, Post and Harold Gatty. Around the World in Eight Days. Chicago: Rand McNally and Company, 1931.

Wilkins, George H. (Captain). Flying the Arctic. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1928.

William Mitchell, Our Air Force. New York: E.P. Dutton, 1925. Signed by author.

Wilson, Eugene E. Air Power for Peace. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1945. Inscribed by author.

Wilson, Eugene E. Kitty Hawk to Sputnik to Polaris. [not given]: Barre Gazette, 1960. Signed by author.

Wilson, Eugene E. Slipstream: An Autobiography. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1950. Inscribed by author.

Winchester, Clarence. Flying Men and Their Machines. New York: E.P. Dutton and Company, 1926.

Winslow, Carroll Dana. With the French Flying Corps. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1917.

Woolley, James G. et al. Airplane Transportation. London: Hartwell Publishing Corporation, 1929.

Wright, Orville. “How We Invented the Aeroplane,” Harper’s Magazine, June 1953.

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Collections of William E. Boeing Sr. Materials 

Boeing Company Landing Field

Small collection of documents for the Boeing Company Landing Field can be found in the technical files. Digital materials are stored on the Image server and include maps and photographs.

Williams E Boeing Sr Photographs

There are photographs of William E Boeing Sr in a number of other collections.

The Boeing Company historical photograph series: K Series of the Kirsten-Boeing Tug Boat with Cyclodial Propeller P Series of early Boeing Aircraft Company photos circa 1917/1919 B Series of Boeing Aircraft Company photos circa 1920's/1930s

K Series Photographs Photographs of the construction and launching of the Kirsten Boeing K-B M1 cycloidal propeller boat. Boeing met University of Washington Proffessor Frederick Kirsten while his company was building Hickman Sea Sleds. K-B Engineering was formed to develop Proffessor Kirsten’s design. In 1922 the propeller was tested on the experimental M-879 sports boat. (When the propulsion system wasn’t put into production in the United States, Kirsten sold the patent to the German company Voith who further developed the system and it is still in use today)

B & P Series Photographs Boeing company photos dating from the inception of the company. Most of the photos are of the plant and aircraft construction but Mr. Boeing Sr. does appear in a few. Photos of the Pacific Aero Products Seaplane Hanger and the Boeing B&W are in the B-series photos.

The Biographical Files: Several photos of William E Boeing Sr through the years.

The Steve Stimpson United Air Lines Photo Album: Photos of the ceremony for the first trans-continenal mail flight

Louis Marsh Photographs Mr. Marsh was a metallurgist with the Boeing Aircraft Company and his collection contains a number of photos of the Hickman Sea Sled.

Harold Jensen Collection Photographs of the B&W in flight.

William E Boeing Moving Images

The museum does not have the equipment to duplicate film or video. These items will need to to be sent out to a lab for copying.

16mm Film footage: Phil Johnson Family home movies footage of Mr & Mrs. William E Boeing at a party circa late 20's early 30's

16mm Film Footage: William Boeing Sr & US Army Representatives at Camp Lewis for Flight of Boeing PW-9 (Transfered see Videos #2797 & 2798)

Video #2797 Gathering of Giants & Mr. Boeing, Mr Gott and PW-9 Vialta Transfer BetaCam SP Video #2798 Gathering of Giants & Mr. Boeing, Mr Gott and PW-9 DownConvert - Edgecrop BetaCam SP

Other Misc. William E Boeing Sr. Materials

Stored with other Boeing materials in the general archives:

Oversize Photo of Porter's Might one of Boeing race horses, WEB by horse (Purchased for exhibit use)

Resolution Framed Resolution naming Boeing Field 1928 (FIC)

Photo/Painting of WEB Douglas DC-5 Rover (FIC)

Postcard- Oversized from City of Des Moines IA (FIC)

Map of Boeing Family Homesteading in German (Copied from German Archives by Wolf Czaia in 2008)

 2009-6-12FIC Wilhem Boing (Boeing) Letters 1869-1874   0.1 Linear feet , consisting of six letter sized file folders stored in a flap-closure file.

Wilhelm Boing Letters

1. Letter and Envelope: Oct 6, 1872 from Wilhelm Boeing to ? on "Office of Charles E. Orthman" letterhead. Envelope is addressed to Wilhem Boing Sr. in Westfalen Germany.

2. Letter, blue paper, folded to become self-envelope: Nov 6, 1872 to Wilhelm Boing from Wilhelm Boing Sr. via Charles Orthman in East Saginaw Michigan.

3. Letter, blue paper: Feb 26, 1869 to Wilhelm Boing from Wilhelm Boing Sr.

4. Letter, blue paper, folded to become self-envelope: ? 25, 1874 to Wilhelm Boeing from Wilhelm Boing Sr. via Charles Orthman in East Saginaw Michigan.

5. Letter, blue paper: Sept 13, 1869 to Wilhelm Boing from Wilhelm Boing Sr.

6. Letter, Wilhelm Boeing Letterhead: April 18, 1883 Letterhead: "Wilhelm Boeing Pine, Lands and Logs Detroit Michigan"

Translation of Letters

June 2008, the museum will work toward getting the letters translated into English at a future date.

Wilhelm Boing Letters General Note

These are a collection of letters between William E. Boeing Sr's. father, Wilhelm Boeing Jr. and his father Wilhelm Boeing Sr. The museum obtained the letters from a German documentary producer. William E Boeing Jr., the son of William E. Boeing Sr. gave the film maker the letters after an interview, the film maker felt that history would be better served if the letters were kept at the museum. Digital scans of the letters were provided to the film maker for use in his documentary.

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