The Boeing B-52 was developed as a strategic long-range bomber. Originally designed to deliver nuclear weapons from high altitude, it has demonstrated flexibility in a variety of unforeseen roles. During the Vietnam War, the aircraft was adapted to carry up to 84 500-pound conventional bombs. Over time, advances in anti-aircraft missiles required a shift to a low altitude, under-the-radar mission profile. In the 1980s, the B-52 began a new role as a stand-off cruise missile launch platform. The aircraft continues to adapt to new 21st century missions in response to changing requirements and threats.

The YB-52 prototype first flew at Boeing Field in April 1952, and the B-52A entered service with the U.S. Air Force in 1955. A total of 744 B-52s were produced in Seattle, Washington and Wichita, Kansas, culminating with the B-52H model last delivered in 1962. Some B-52H aircraft are expected to continue operation until 2040.

The Museum's B-52 was one of 193 G-models built at Boeing's Wichita plant. The G-model incorporated numerous improvements in avionics, fuel system, and flight controls, as well as a shorter vertical fin. The Museum's B-52 was delivered to the U.S. Air Force in October 1960 and spent its entire service life with the Strategic Air Command. It was one of 110 B-52Gs that saw combat during the Vietnam War as part of Operation Bullet Shot/Linebacker. When it was retired in 1991, it had accumulated 15,305 hours of flight time. It was demilitarized under the terms of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) in August 1992.

After its retirement, the aircraft was placed in outdoor storage at Paine Field in Everett, Washington. In June 2017, the Museum launched "Project Welcome Home," a fundraising effort to restore this aircraft for inclusion in a commemorative park honoring Vietnam War veterans. In 2019, the restored B-52 was relocated to the Museum's main campus, where its serves as the centerpiece of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Park.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force.

Registration:
59-2584
Wingspan:
185.00ft
Length:
159ft
Height:
41ft
Wing Area:
4 000.00ft²
Gross Weight:
488,000lbs
Cruise Speed:
650mph
Power Plant:
Eight Pratt & Whitney J57-P-43WB engines
Range:
7,500miles

The Boeing B-52 was developed as a strategic long-range bomber. Originally designed to deliver nuclear weapons from high altitude, it has demonstrated flexibility in a variety of unforeseen roles. During the Vietnam War, the aircraft was adapted to carry up to 84 500-pound conventional bombs. Over time, advances in anti-aircraft missiles required a shift to a low altitude, under-the-radar mission profile. In the 1980s, the B-52 began a new role as a stand-off cruise missile launch platform. The aircraft continues to adapt to new 21st century missions in response to changing requirements and threats.

The YB-52 prototype first flew at Boeing Field in April 1952, and the B-52A entered service with the U.S. Air Force in 1955. A total of 744 B-52s were produced in Seattle, Washington and Wichita, Kansas, culminating with the B-52H model last delivered in 1962. Some B-52H aircraft are expected to continue operation until 2040.

The Museum's B-52 was one of 193 G-models built at Boeing's Wichita plant. The G-model incorporated numerous improvements in avionics, fuel system, and flight controls, as well as a shorter vertical fin. The Museum's B-52 was delivered to the U.S. Air Force in October 1960 and spent its entire service life with the Strategic Air Command. It was one of 110 B-52Gs that saw combat during the Vietnam War as part of Operation Bullet Shot/Linebacker. When it was retired in 1991, it had accumulated 15,305 hours of flight time. It was demilitarized under the terms of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) in August 1992.

After its retirement, the aircraft was placed in outdoor storage at Paine Field in Everett, Washington. In June 2017, the Museum launched "Project Welcome Home," a fundraising effort to restore this aircraft for inclusion in a commemorative park honoring Vietnam War veterans. In 2019, the restored B-52 was relocated to the Museum's main campus, where its serves as the centerpiece of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Park.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force.

Registration:
59-2584
Wingspan:
185.00ft
Length:
159ft
Height:
41ft
Wing Area:
4 000.00ft²
Gross Weight:
488,000lbs
Cruise Speed:
650mph
Power Plant:
Eight Pratt & Whitney J57-P-43WB engines
Range:
7,500miles