The DC-1 was developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company in 1932 in response to TWA's (then Transcontinental & Western Air) requirement for a new all-metal airliner. Since United Airlines had an exclusive deal with Boeing for the initial production run of its revolutionary 247, TWA was forced to seek another source for a modern aircraft. Douglas won the contract with what would prove to be an industry-changing series of aircraft.

Only one DC-1 was built before the design was improved. The DC-2 was developed when TWA and Douglas decided to increase the fuselage length of the DC-1 by two feet, which added one additional row of seats and increased the passenger capacity to 14. The first DC-2 took to the air on May 11, 1934. Commercial and military versions of the DC-2 quickly became popular and filled the skies around the world. A DC-2 operated by the Dutch airline KLM created a sensation by finishing second overall in the MacRobertson Race from Mildenhall, UK to Melbourne, Australia in October 1934, competing against purpose-built racing aircraft. A total of 198 DC-2s were built, but the safe, comfortable, and reliable aircraft was soon overshadowed by a further improvement: the Douglas DC-3.

The Museum's DC-2 was delivered to Pan American Airways (PAA) as NC-14296 in March 1935. It later flew with PAA affiliate Cia Mexicana de Aviacion as XA-BJL. It was sold in 1940 to A/v de Guatemala and reregistered as LG-ACA, then sold again in 1945 to Aviateca as TC-ACA. In 1953, Johnson Flying Service in Montana acquired the aircraft, and it served as a smoke jumper and cargo airplane for many years. It was eventually bought by Evergreen International Aviation, who donated it to the Museum of Flying in Santa Monica, California in 1975. Restored to airworthiness in 1982 by the Douglas Historical Foundation, it was given the TWA markings of the very first DC-2. The Museum of Flight purchased the aircraft in 1998.

Serial Number:
1368
Registration:
N1934D
Wingspan:
85.00ft
Length:
62ft
Height:
16ft
Wing Area:
939.00ft²
Empty Weight:
12,408lbs
Gross Weight:
18,560lbs
Maximum Speed:
210mph
Cruise Speed:
190mph
Power Plant:
Two Wright R-1820 975 h.p. engines
Range:
1,000miles

360˚ Panoramas

Cockpit
Cabin

Matterport 3D Tour

Douglas DC-2 Matterport 3D Tour

The DC-1 was developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company in 1932 in response to TWA's (then Transcontinental & Western Air) requirement for a new all-metal airliner. Since United Airlines had an exclusive deal with Boeing for the initial production run of its revolutionary 247, TWA was forced to seek another source for a modern aircraft. Douglas won the contract with what would prove to be an industry-changing series of aircraft.

Only one DC-1 was built before the design was improved. The DC-2 was developed when TWA and Douglas decided to increase the fuselage length of the DC-1 by two feet, which added one additional row of seats and increased the passenger capacity to 14. The first DC-2 took to the air on May 11, 1934. Commercial and military versions of the DC-2 quickly became popular and filled the skies around the world. A DC-2 operated by the Dutch airline KLM created a sensation by finishing second overall in the MacRobertson Race from Mildenhall, UK to Melbourne, Australia in October 1934, competing against purpose-built racing aircraft. A total of 198 DC-2s were built, but the safe, comfortable, and reliable aircraft was soon overshadowed by a further improvement: the Douglas DC-3.

The Museum's DC-2 was delivered to Pan American Airways (PAA) as NC-14296 in March 1935. It later flew with PAA affiliate Cia Mexicana de Aviacion as XA-BJL. It was sold in 1940 to A/v de Guatemala and reregistered as LG-ACA, then sold again in 1945 to Aviateca as TC-ACA. In 1953, Johnson Flying Service in Montana acquired the aircraft, and it served as a smoke jumper and cargo airplane for many years. It was eventually bought by Evergreen International Aviation, who donated it to the Museum of Flying in Santa Monica, California in 1975. Restored to airworthiness in 1982 by the Douglas Historical Foundation, it was given the TWA markings of the very first DC-2. The Museum of Flight purchased the aircraft in 1998.

Serial Number:
1368
Registration:
N1934D
Wingspan:
85.00ft
Length:
62ft
Height:
16ft
Wing Area:
939.00ft²
Empty Weight:
12,408lbs
Gross Weight:
18,560lbs
Maximum Speed:
210mph
Cruise Speed:
190mph
Power Plant:
Two Wright R-1820 975 h.p. engines
Range:
1,000miles

360˚ Panoramas

Cockpit
Cabin

Matterport 3D Tour

Douglas DC-2 Matterport 3D Tour