The Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) is a full-scale mockup of the space shuttle orbiter, minus the wings. It was used for general familiarization training, emergency egress training, and training for certain functions such as galley operation, payload bay systems, and lighting. It also served as a test bed for upgrades to the shuttle fleet. Built at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the 1970s, it was the oldest mockup in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF).

The SVMF was located inside Building 9 of JSC in Houston, Texas. It housed several space shuttle mockups, including the FFT, as well as mockups of every major pressurized module on the International Space Station. While many of the systems in the SVMF mockups are flight-like, they do not contain what are generally known as simulators (as used to train pilots). Instead, the FFT and other trainers in the SVMF were used for astronaut training in housekeeping, in-flight maintenance, stowage familiarity, ingress/egress, etc.

It typically took at least a year and sometimes longer for astronauts to train, depending on the objectives of the mission. Each crew spent up to 100 hours training in the SVMF in more than 20 separate classes. It took a versatile team comprising a variety of skills and experience to develop, maintain, and operate the SVMF. Specialists such as designers, engineers, project managers, electronic technicians, and shop technicians were used to create the accurate mockups to train astronauts, test systems and procedures, and conduct training.

The Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) is a full-scale mockup of the space shuttle orbiter, minus the wings. It was used for general familiarization training, emergency egress training, and training for certain functions such as galley operation, payload bay systems, and lighting. It also served as a test bed for upgrades to the shuttle fleet. Built at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the 1970s, it was the oldest mockup in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF).

The SVMF was located inside Building 9 of JSC in Houston, Texas. It housed several space shuttle mockups, including the FFT, as well as mockups of every major pressurized module on the International Space Station. While many of the systems in the SVMF mockups are flight-like, they do not contain what are generally known as simulators (as used to train pilots). Instead, the FFT and other trainers in the SVMF were used for astronaut training in housekeeping, in-flight maintenance, stowage familiarity, ingress/egress, etc.

It typically took at least a year and sometimes longer for astronauts to train, depending on the objectives of the mission. Each crew spent up to 100 hours training in the SVMF in more than 20 separate classes. It took a versatile team comprising a variety of skills and experience to develop, maintain, and operate the SVMF. Specialists such as designers, engineers, project managers, electronic technicians, and shop technicians were used to create the accurate mockups to train astronauts, test systems and procedures, and conduct training.